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The Official Nottingham Forest v Bristol City Match Day Thread


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Great read as always Hav.

Intrigued to see our new signings and provide support at this “difficult time” I have made a late decision to go to today’s game.  I have also arranged to combine the match with meeting my daughter who is at uni there. She hates football but I have done a deal with her that I’ll take her out for lunch if she comes to watch City. I am relying on LJ, the players and fellow travelling contingent to make it a day to remember and help my emotional blackmail crusade that it is in her roots.

Don’t let me down (please) :fingerscrossed:.

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1 hour ago, havanatopia said:

Good day everyone,

In the final phase before he died in 1930 D.H. Lawrence wrote numerous reviews, essays and poems, including one entitled Nottingham's New University.

In seven scathing verses, he describes Nottingham as "that dismal town, where I went to school and college" and writes disparagingly of the "grand and cakey style" of the buildings, financed by the "noble loot" of Sir Jesse Boot. (yes the son of the founder and the transformer of the Boots Company of Nottingham). Nottingham is home to three literary greats. The current Notts County manager, who needs his mouth washed out with grit and water, could not be further removed from Lord Byron, D.H. Lawrence and John Sillitoe. Each left indelible marks on the city. Lawrence's poetry was full of dark irony and wit so he may have partially been talking sardonically with those rather disparaging words of the city of his birth. 

Lawrence, one of the world's most acclaimed novelists, was the son of an Eastwood miner. While he knew miners, their families, the cramped houses, the cruelties and debasements and the smell of the slag heaps, he knew too the nearby countryside and captured all in his novels. While famous for Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterley's Lover, published in 1913 and 1928 respectively, the novel that was actually banned for obscenity was The Rainbow in 1915. He wrote extensively about the dehumanising effects of industrialisation and modernity.

So great are the writings considered from Nottingham in fact that in December 2015 it became a UNESCO City of Literature. One of only 20 cities around the world recognised by UNESCO for the sheer quality and quantity of literary excellence.

I can recommend a certain Mr. Sheridan to the literary self readings in Nottingham to broaden the mind and educate the brain cells that appear warped with filth. Sitting on a hard flagstone and reading Sons & Lovers might tranquilise his mind. He will for sure be a better man for it and boy do those long suffering fans across the Trent from the City Ground deserve it.

download.jpeg

Talking of poetry I recite a few verses from David Prowse who wrote of Brian Clough. I would venture thrice the man the County boss will ever be.

What made him so endearing is elusive to explain, 
This tyrant in a sweatshirt barking orders in the rain. 
Today he offered vitriol, tomorrow marzipan, 
A paradox, a puzzle but a diamond of a man. 

Young Cloughie did things his way, for no-one showed him how, 
Emerging from the backstreets like a blossom on a bow. 
Becoming proud and peerless as a hero of his time, 
And then, one tackle later, down and out at twenty-nine. 

Where others might have wilted or nestled in their grief, 
Cloughie found salvation in his cocky self belief. 
Come set-back or adversity, a man is still a man, 
So it was, as one dream ended, that another one began. 

Cloughie's team played football in the manner meant to be, 
A joy for those who wore his shirt and those who came to see, 
No arguments, no ego trips, no stars to shine alone, 
As Cloughie scolded, Cloughie scowled, and loved them as his own. 

For behind the bullish phrases, all the arrogance and pride, 
There beat a kindly human heart, as deep as it was wide. 
Deserving of an epitaph, significant but sad, 
Just the greatest England manager that England never had. 

And where have all the great British managers gone. Infiltrated, swarmed even, with men of foreign tongue perhaps more adroit at managing over-paid egos from here and abroad. The likes of Allardyce, Bruce, Warnock and McCarthy perhaps the last of their breed. 

Forest once were great, for a fleeting moment in time. Fortunes come and fortunes go. 

And our fortunes rest with a refreshed squad, a patching up of tiffs, and perhaps a renewed self belief. Should that prevail today or will a nervous new lad between the sticks, maybe thrust immediately into the limelight, find himself too nervous to cope? There might be irony, there might be tears even, if we see the 'saviour' of the Lee Johnson project falter at the first hurdle, concede two howlers and condemn City to a record breaking 8th straight league loss? Could Fabian Giefer's performance unwittingly precipitate what unravels in the immediate aftermath of today's match? 

What would Brian Clough do? Would he play it 'safe' with Fielding or, having seen the skill set of the new loan goalkeeper from FC Schalke 04, put him immediately into the firing line? I know what I would do; fortune will favour the brave. 

Did anybody go and see the marvellous Nottingham caves on the last fixture in the East Midlands? I wrote about it just under a year ago here:-

Enjoy the game today. Well done to all those making the journey. Another supreme effort.

UTC

Condensed Version

Nottingham:

Stinks of slagheaps but a good place to write a book

1-1 draw

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The is the big one. The bragging rights.

Me, the lad and the daughter looking for an away win. 

The wife and her family looking for a home win. 

Couldnt really pick two teams in more rank form! More so than ever, I hope we do well. 

And I'd really like to see Tomlin today...

 

Giefer

 

Flint 

Wright

Magnusson

 

Bryan

Hegeler

GON

Little

 

Tomlin

 

Djuric

Abraham

 

Edited by Fordy62
  • Like 4
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2 hours ago, havanatopia said:

Good day everyone,

In the final phase before he died in 1930 D.H. Lawrence wrote numerous reviews, essays and poems, including one entitled Nottingham's New University.

In seven scathing verses, he describes Nottingham as "that dismal town, where I went to school and college" and writes disparagingly of the "grand and cakey style" of the buildings, financed by the "noble loot" of Sir Jesse Boot. (yes the son of the founder and the transformer of the Boots Company of Nottingham). Nottingham is home to three literary greats. The current Notts County manager, who needs his mouth washed out with grit and water, could not be further removed from Lord Byron, D.H. Lawrence and John Sillitoe. Each left indelible marks on the city. Lawrence's poetry was full of dark irony and wit so he may have partially been talking sardonically with those rather disparaging words of the city of his birth. 

Lawrence, one of the world's most acclaimed novelists, was the son of an Eastwood miner. While he knew miners, their families, the cramped houses, the cruelties and debasements and the smell of the slag heaps, he knew too the nearby countryside and captured all in his novels. While famous for Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterley's Lover, published in 1913 and 1928 respectively, the novel that was actually banned for obscenity was The Rainbow in 1915. He wrote extensively about the dehumanising effects of industrialisation and modernity.

So great are the writings considered from Nottingham in fact that in December 2015 it became a UNESCO City of Literature. One of only 20 cities around the world recognised by UNESCO for the sheer quality and quantity of literary excellence.

I can recommend a certain Mr. Sheridan to the literary self readings in Nottingham to broaden the mind and educate the brain cells that appear warped with filth. Sitting on a hard flagstone and reading Sons & Lovers might tranquilise his mind. He will for sure be a better man for it and boy do those long suffering fans across the Trent from the City Ground deserve it.

download.jpeg

Talking of poetry I recite a few verses from David Prowse who wrote of Brian Clough. I would venture thrice the man the County boss will ever be.

What made him so endearing is elusive to explain, 
This tyrant in a sweatshirt barking orders in the rain. 
Today he offered vitriol, tomorrow marzipan, 
A paradox, a puzzle but a diamond of a man. 

Young Cloughie did things his way, for no-one showed him how, 
Emerging from the backstreets like a blossom on a bow. 
Becoming proud and peerless as a hero of his time, 
And then, one tackle later, down and out at twenty-nine. 

Where others might have wilted or nestled in their grief, 
Cloughie found salvation in his cocky self belief. 
Come set-back or adversity, a man is still a man, 
So it was, as one dream ended, that another one began. 

Cloughie's team played football in the manner meant to be, 
A joy for those who wore his shirt and those who came to see, 
No arguments, no ego trips, no stars to shine alone, 
As Cloughie scolded, Cloughie scowled, and loved them as his own. 

For behind the bullish phrases, all the arrogance and pride, 
There beat a kindly human heart, as deep as it was wide. 
Deserving of an epitaph, significant but sad, 
Just the greatest England manager that England never had. 

And where have all the great British managers gone. Infiltrated, swarmed even, with men of foreign tongue perhaps more adroit at managing over-paid egos from here and abroad. The likes of Allardyce, Bruce, Warnock and McCarthy perhaps the last of their breed. 

Forest once were great, for a fleeting moment in time. Fortunes come and fortunes go. 

And our fortunes rest with a refreshed squad, a patching up of tiffs, and perhaps a renewed self belief. Should that prevail today or will a nervous new lad between the sticks, maybe thrust immediately into the limelight, find himself too nervous to cope? There might be irony, there might be tears even, if we see the 'saviour' of the Lee Johnson project falter at the first hurdle, concede two howlers and condemn City to a record breaking 8th straight league loss? Could Fabian Giefer's performance unwittingly precipitate what unravels in the immediate aftermath of today's match? 

What would Brian Clough do? Would he play it 'safe' with Fielding or, having seen the skill set of the new loan goalkeeper from FC Schalke 04, put him immediately into the firing line? I know what I would do; fortune will favour the brave. 

Did anybody go and see the marvellous Nottingham caves on the last fixture in the East Midlands? I wrote about it just under a year ago here:-

Enjoy the game today. Well done to all those making the journey. Another supreme effort.

UTC

Cloughie would put him in , just as he gave a young Chris Woods his debut in the European cup final .

He gave his players the belief that they were the best .

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21 minutes ago, Major Isewater said:

Cloughie would put him in , just as he gave a young Chris Woods his debut in the European cup final .

He gave his players the belief that they were the best .

Don't think he did.

You sure you're not thinking of Nigel Spink for Villa, came on to replace Jimmy Rimmer?

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Think LJ will pick the same team as against Fleetwood, but with Fabs in goal. Now we have better players in, I expect less changing of the team too, just the occasional injury or fatigue switch to the line up. Think freeman will be left out of squad and off to QPR. Think LJ will keep Patterson in the hole today for his knowledge of the forest players and also for his industry, especially his coming across to help the wide players. Tammy, Djuric, and Patterson to score. Our defenders to rejoice at the sight of us possessing a keeper who commands his box and catches crosses.

3-0 win to city. COYR, let’s continue the turnaround. It’s my birthday.

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3 hours ago, havanatopia said:

Good day everyone,

In the final phase before he died in 1930 D.H. Lawrence wrote numerous reviews, essays and poems, including one entitled Nottingham's New University.

In seven scathing verses, he describes Nottingham as "that dismal town, where I went to school and college" and writes disparagingly of the "grand and cakey style" of the buildings, financed by the "noble loot" of Sir Jesse Boot. (yes the son of the founder and the transformer of the Boots Company of Nottingham). Nottingham is home to three literary greats. The current Notts County manager, who needs his mouth washed out with grit and water, could not be further removed from Lord Byron, D.H. Lawrence and John Sillitoe. Each left indelible marks on the city. Lawrence's poetry was full of dark irony and wit so he may have partially been talking sardonically with those rather disparaging words of the city of his birth. 

Lawrence, one of the world's most acclaimed novelists, was the son of an Eastwood miner. While he knew miners, their families, the cramped houses, the cruelties and debasements and the smell of the slag heaps, he knew too the nearby countryside and captured all in his novels. While famous for Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterley's Lover, published in 1913 and 1928 respectively, the novel that was actually banned for obscenity was The Rainbow in 1915. He wrote extensively about the dehumanising effects of industrialisation and modernity.

So great are the writings considered from Nottingham in fact that in December 2015 it became a UNESCO City of Literature. One of only 20 cities around the world recognised by UNESCO for the sheer quality and quantity of literary excellence.

I can recommend a certain Mr. Sheridan to the literary self readings in Nottingham to broaden the mind and educate the brain cells that appear warped with filth. Sitting on a hard flagstone and reading Sons & Lovers might tranquilise his mind. He will for sure be a better man for it and boy do those long suffering fans across the Trent from the City Ground deserve it.

download.jpeg

Talking of poetry I recite a few verses from David Prowse who wrote of Brian Clough. I would venture thrice the man the County boss will ever be.

What made him so endearing is elusive to explain, 
This tyrant in a sweatshirt barking orders in the rain. 
Today he offered vitriol, tomorrow marzipan, 
A paradox, a puzzle but a diamond of a man. 

Young Cloughie did things his way, for no-one showed him how, 
Emerging from the backstreets like a blossom on a bow. 
Becoming proud and peerless as a hero of his time, 
And then, one tackle later, down and out at twenty-nine. 

Where others might have wilted or nestled in their grief, 
Cloughie found salvation in his cocky self belief. 
Come set-back or adversity, a man is still a man, 
So it was, as one dream ended, that another one began. 

Cloughie's team played football in the manner meant to be, 
A joy for those who wore his shirt and those who came to see, 
No arguments, no ego trips, no stars to shine alone, 
As Cloughie scolded, Cloughie scowled, and loved them as his own. 

For behind the bullish phrases, all the arrogance and pride, 
There beat a kindly human heart, as deep as it was wide. 
Deserving of an epitaph, significant but sad, 
Just the greatest England manager that England never had. 

And where have all the great British managers gone. Infiltrated, swarmed even, with men of foreign tongue perhaps more adroit at managing over-paid egos from here and abroad. The likes of Allardyce, Bruce, Warnock and McCarthy perhaps the last of their breed. 

Forest once were great, for a fleeting moment in time. Fortunes come and fortunes go. 

And our fortunes rest with a refreshed squad, a patching up of tiffs, and perhaps a renewed self belief. Should that prevail today or will a nervous new lad between the sticks, maybe thrust immediately into the limelight, find himself too nervous to cope? There might be irony, there might be tears even, if we see the 'saviour' of the Lee Johnson project falter at the first hurdle, concede two howlers and condemn City to a record breaking 8th straight league loss? Could Fabian Giefer's performance unwittingly precipitate what unravels in the immediate aftermath of today's match? 

What would Brian Clough do? Would he play it 'safe' with Fielding or, having seen the skill set of the new loan goalkeeper from FC Schalke 04, put him immediately into the firing line? I know what I would do; fortune will favour the brave. 

Did anybody go and see the marvellous Nottingham caves on the last fixture in the East Midlands? I wrote about it just under a year ago here:-

Enjoy the game today. Well done to all those making the journey. Another supreme effort.

UTC

Win by at least 3 today. 

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To add to Havanatopia's reference to literary Nottingham figures, remember that Alan Sillitoe in his work, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, gives City their only mention, as far as I am aware, in a literary work.  In the story City beat Notts County 2-1! Hopefully the score against Forest today.

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The alternative version

Morning all.

Just going to tag @Neo as I know he'd want to see this.

 

Sooooooooo. Nottingham. I've been there a few times as my ex lives there. So I can honestly, hand on heart, confirm it is a shithole. Apart from the giant stone lions in the town centre. Great fun when you've nailed a few bottles of sauvignon blanc and your boyfriend is a prude who you want to annoy... 

It's northern. Somewhere near Leicester. 

Nottingham is famous for the legend of Robin Hood and his Merry Men, all camping out in Sherwood Forest. Kind of like the bunch of MPs and pop celebs who 'enjoy time' in Hampstead Heath nowadays. Now you know why Robin called them his 'merry men'. 

As @havanatopia has mentioned, Nottingham is famous for Boots the company (I've been past their HQ and it looks like a giant block of ice) and also bike making - famous bikes such as Katie Price and Jodie Marsh were made elsewhere so don't include these.

 

On to the Forest team. Currently under the caretaking of Gary Brazil, Mr B has the most exotic and most boring name in the history of planet earth ever. He also spends his Christmases trying to be cracked with a nutcracker, and when that fails (those Brazils are just indestructible), has to dodge sledgehammers and mallets galore.

The fans hate Fawaz the owner. Like protests, petitions and good old banners as far as the eyes can see. Coincidentally Steve Cotterill was manager when Fawaz took over. SC was promptly sacked after the sale. Dunno why.

They play at the City Ground. This is the actual City Ground (not the nickname for Ashton Gate - which is also known as the city ground affectionately to locals). The probably stole the name from us. Just like Robin Hood stole from the rich to give to the poor. Can't blame them.

Finally, why does the Forest logo look like a tree alone at sea? I mean if I saw a solitary tree in the water at Weston, I'd wonder how it got there. Perhaps it's because they are known as Florist. Perhaps they have discovered a horticultural skill and are experimenting with trees.

 

On to today. It's last chance saloon again for LJ. He must be as nervous as Donald Trump's toupee maker, watching his client in a gale force wind.

I predict a 2-2 draw. Djuric will finally score. Engvall will be back on his arse, warming the wood. John Cleese is now sat on the bench alongside Pembo, whom he leans across and whispers to LJ "we've got two of them now. Don't mention the bloody war!"

So another escape for LJ? We shall see...

Edited by Septic Peg
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Vital, vital, vital match for many reasons.

While we don't have to win today (we could lose and still stay up, of course), I'm not sure anything other than three points is really acceptable.

Forest have no manager, are also in crap form, just sold their captain, and have off the field problems to rival anyone in this league.

If we cannot break a losing streak like the one we are on against this side; when the hell can we.

It'll be tense.  It'll be tight.  But I hope we can sneak it by a goal, and maybe put some light between us and the relegation places.

Tammy to be our hero once again.

COYR

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1 minute ago, glos old boy said:

Just saw CATS coach off at Stroud Jct M5 didn't know they still picked up there...........do they do this for all up North games? I know they used to pick up all over 40yrs ago but thought they stopped that now.

Same, they said to me before they no longer picked up on motorway junctions due to health &  safety reasons...

That was a while ago mind

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12 minutes ago, cynic said:

Its the proverbial six pointer with the prospect of bottom three looming for the losers (or at least level on points if Blackburn get a result which I think they will).

Forest on the ropes having scored three in their last seven and conceded twelve, but we are on an even worse run that them...

I'm sorry to say that I can't see us stopping them scoring - its a case of can we take the chances we will undoubtedly make ? Not sure about that.

I think it'll be a draw, loss, win, oh I don't ******* know.

I think there will be a result. (Cue game abandoned after 20 minutes)

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24 minutes ago, cynic said:

Its the proverbial six pointer with the prospect of bottom three looming for the losers (or at least level on points if Blackburn get a result which I think they will).

Forest on the ropes having scored three in their last seven and conceded twelve, but we are on an even worse run that them...

I'm sorry to say that I can't see us stopping them scoring - its a case of can we take the chances we will undoubtedly make ? Not sure about that.

I think it'll be a draw, loss, win, oh I don't ******* know.

Away win today, super confident not been confident for a while.

They've sold their best player, no manager, club in a complete mess. Surely we can't not win this!

My only concern is do we play the new keeper with probably no time spent in training with the team. Do we have him on the bench and bring him in next week ? 

 

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2 hours ago, Major Isewater said:

Cloughie would put him in , just as he gave a young Chris Woods his debut in the European cup final .

He gave his players the belief that they were the best .

I definitely hope Geifer starts. For one thing, I don't think playing safe by sticking to Fielding is an option for the simple reason I don't think picking Fielding is ever playing safe. You can never be sure if he's going to keep us in the game with a host of great saves or toss it away with a calamitous howler...

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5 minutes ago, daored said:

My only concern is do we play the new keeper with probably no time spent in training with the team. Do we have him on the bench and bring him in next week ? 

 

Tough call. If he plays FF and he concedes more soft goals, potentially costing us the match then surely game over? 

However, proverbial 6 pointer not the best time for a debutant GK? 

I'm actually nervous about the lineup!

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