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CyderInACan

It all kicked off in Bristol (Merged)

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2 hours ago, REDOXO said:

Saw them all. 

The most Mayhem. The Clash

biggest punch up. Souixsie and the banshees (Robert smith on guitar)

best band The Jam

best musicians. The Stranglers 

best visuals Orchestral Manouvers pre OMD

biggest influence Joy Division

 

Same. Agree with much of that, except the biggest punch up I saw (well, was caught up in the middle of) was the Bristol Mods v Gloucester Skins on the dance floor at a Selecter gig at the Locarno in about 1980/81. Insane violence. 

 

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5 hours ago, City Rocker said:

Same. Agree with much of that, except the biggest punch up I saw (well, was caught up in the middle of) was the Bristol Mods v Gloucester Skins on the dance floor at a Selecter gig at the Locarno in about 1980/81. Insane violence. 

 

Bristol Pachucos SC.......

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On 2/18/2018 at 15:48, City Rocker said:

Same. Agree with much of that, except the biggest punch up I saw (well, was caught up in the middle of) was the Bristol Mods v Gloucester Skins on the dance floor at a Selecter gig at the Locarno in about 1980/81. Insane violence. 

 

Siouxsie was The Hammersmith Palais. They came out and cranked it. Smith was on guitar and the whole place just erupted. Your momentum pushed you to the wall and the fighting was insane. Those whining about footy violence would not have believed it

anyway in true 70/80s fashion The Banshees played on and whipped it up. Never forget that. As bad as I have seen outside of a battlefield. 

The Clash was pure bloody madness. But never really fighting just Everyman for him self. 

The tightest was the last hometown Jam gig In Guildford. Working boys the jam of course. That was the town called malice! Guildford had The Stranglers. Saw them dozens of times. Most memorable at the Lyceum the night the shah of Iran died. Came straight out and said the Shah is dead and played shah shah a gogo 

caught Fergal Sharkey on the neck with the most glorious greeny ever  in about 1980 he didn’t even flinch! 

Those were teenage kicks!! Happy Days!

 

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On ‎18‎/‎02‎/‎2018 at 17:10, archie andrews said:

much prefer the soul/funk even disco of the time.....too political and angry for me all that nonsense

Yeah loved it all still do. But the real soul sounds were all 70s.

Detroit spinners, Emeralds, Archie Bell, Howard Melvin, Chie Lites and on and on.

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Just got back from holiday and read 'It All Kicked Off In Bristol' whilst away.

Whilst perhaps being a bit biased I have to say its probably the best book on the subject. It's more of a biography than a list of generic encounters and I was interested to read Paul's background and life as much as the culture he became part of. It's also very honest and matter of fact unlike many of the similar books of this nature.

I am sure many will disagree with the whole notion of the book and what it represents. I'd like to think I have a more balanced view and can see how it all happened and why its alluring to many. 

I found it a fascinating insight into something I didn't know a huge amount of (the CSF) and recommend it to anyone with is interested in the culture and its history.

I think Paul posts on here so if you are reading this mate, well done, it's a superb read.

Edited by One Team
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On 15/02/2018 at 19:38, GasDestroyer said:

One of the problems with forums like this is you get posters who were’nt even about in the 70s and 80s, let alone going to football matches. Ashton Gate like many grounds was a truly dangerous place at home games. Bristol City had a fearsome reputation for away fans after riots (Swindon and Reading) and large scale trouble with others such as Millwall. 

Yes, I was involved at certain games as others I know on here were. But unless you lived it, you will not understand the culture that existed. Unemployment was sky high, the country was going through a massive depression (Thatcher era), we were at war with the Argies and the IRA, and for many of us football was an escape from the difficult times many of us had to endure.

So before you all rubbish a book which was written by a guy who was in a the thick of it (I can state that for a fact), just try to think about what a massive recession would be like nowadays followed by the country being at war. Death and destruction during the “troubles” was a daily news event. It was all pretty depressing for the country. People wanted to rebel against the establishment, and the way the country was being governed.

After saying all that, the music as mentioned by others was a huge escape alongside football. The two was a perfect release for me on the weekend.

Absolutely spot on GD. One think you didn't mention was the nuclear arms race. The threat of nuclear war was a very real one and the thought of being incinerated in a nano second led to an attitude of " I couldn't give a flying **** about anything". By the way, what became of CND?

 

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I also read it on holiday. It's the only time that I do read a book.

I found it engrossing and couldn't wait to get to the next chapter.

There were quite a few grammatical errors though that detracted from the impact of the read. No excuse for that really, but thats not down to the provider of the book rather the publisher.

One particular point that annoyed me was when The Hen & Chicken was mentioned as being in West Street! Really, as a Bemmie Boy that's shocking. I could of proof read better.

Anyways, I really enjoyed the read overall. It captivated me. 

I can understand that it won't be to everyone's taste. And I don't in any way condone the violence, but thing's did happen then in a way that thankfully won't happen again, hopefully but the world is a messy place.

Also so sad to hear of people I knew that have passed, Acid particularly.

It wasn't until I got to the end of the book and read all the names mentioned - lots of many happy memories and education as a young un - that I then really understood how much of an influence and impact that this could of had on me. But then again, that's the course I chose to follow. 

Luckily, I think I skirted it.

As the great MJ said, I'm a lover not a fighter

Fair play to you Lumbs for opening up and having the balls to create this. 

 

Edited by freezer
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1 hour ago, bristolborn_and_red said:

Absolutely spot on GD. One think you didn't mention was the nuclear arms race. The threat of nuclear war was a very real one and the thought of being incinerated in a nano second led to an attitude of " I couldn't give a flying **** about anything". By the way, what became of CND?

 

Very valid point babber. 

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On 18/02/2018 at 14:08, Portland Bill said:

Saw the Specials at Bristol Locarno in ( roughly!) 1981, at one point there was more of the crowd on the stage than in the arena!!

Saw the coventry automatics (the specials) support the clash in 78  at locarno , remember a very pissed off terry hall covered in spit ... it was grim  . Talking of all out violence -crass at trinity hall wasnt for the faint hearted 

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One of my footy buds at work wanted something to read on holiday early July  - gets bored easily. Told him about the book. “Load of bollox” he says. “Well take it and read the 1st few chapters” I said.

He loved it. And he has not returned it yet, cheeky bastard!

 

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On 09/07/2016 at 09:06, weymouth red said:

Not all thing are bullshit? 

Sometimes pepole remember things differently 

 

Weymouth Red
I was trying to remember the time we went to Chelsea in the Anglo cup I have wrote wot I think I happened but wondered wot your thoughts was on that day?
Match detail: Chelsea v Bristol City
Match Date: Saturday, 2nd Aug 1975
Competition: Anglo Scottish Cup - Mini League / Round Robin
Chelsea v Bristol City
Venue: Stamford Bridge
Attendance: 7,515
Result: Lost 1 - 0

Our day started at temple meads station boarding the early train to Paddington 
For the match at Chelsea a few of us from East Bristol met up with some top boys from 
South Bristol for the game there was about filthy of us going up by train
We arrived in Paddington and took for the tube to Chelsea on the platform was a man in a suit with a suitcase and it sparked a chant of the 60s TV series from us man in a suitcase s we waited on the platform for the tube! 
no one had paid to ride the tube so as we departed at our destination a station attendant asked us for our tickets
He was Quickly pushed back into his ticket room as we jumped over the gates out of the platform  
We proceeded walking towards the ground looking for the Chelsea mob , as we passed by one of there pubs we tried to enter but they locked the doors to keep us from getting to them we moved on by now we were buzzing we found there main pub 
By the ground and went in but it was empty so we bought drinks and settled down 
Some were playing darts 
,the jukebox was on I was sat with my mates Steve and Roger just inside drinking ,
the others were by the bar playing darts , the door burst open and this big black afro one armed Chelsea fan (babs)) and mates 
Stood there and says this is our pub! You think your flash but we're flasher?
Next thing a dart lands in his hair and it goes right off 
Some of our boys jump over the bar and pick up bottles to throw some of us were behind the duke box throwing chairs by now it was just like a bar brawl in a western it seemed to go on for ages but the police arrived to brake it up we were marched out the pub in front the Chelsea mob waiting outside we were taken to outside of the open  end as we walked up to the turnstiles some Chelsea boys came towards us and said something with that a knowle lad (------). Knocked him to the ground and they all move off.
When  We got in the ground Word was spreading around the Chelsea boys wot had gone on and they were giving us Death Threats we were surrounded by them by now! Things were looking bad we had lost the game 1-0
It was our turn to run the gauntlet of the home boys who seemed to be every were outside. After an eventful exit we arrived at Paddington to get our train as we were boarding the train we came under attack from more Chelsea boys as we tried to keep them of the train eventually the train pulled out the station and we were on our way Home!
My account f the day 1975

I was not at that match but a few of my mates from hotwells and ashton were. 

Your account of the fight in the pub is exactly what they told me. They were ib that pub as well.  There was a write up of that fight in the evening post.The landlord said he has never seen a violent bunch of supporters 🥊⚽

I went to the league match a few weeks later and city were in the shed end kicking off. 

On the way home about 100 of us went to Swindon and another brawl 😂 A Swindon fan got stabbed, a city fan got arrested and locked up 😢

 

Edited by our city is red
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OLd thread!

 

I lent the book to one of the old Baby Squad lads (Mikey L) - first words out of his mouth - remember bloody Ashby!

 

Even old Leicester fans loved the book!

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On 04/08/2018 at 00:06, rat23 said:

Saw the coventry automatics (the specials) support the clash in 78  at locarno , remember a very pissed off terry hall covered in spit ... it was grim  . Talking of all out violence -crass at trinity hall wasnt for the faint hearted 

I was at that gig, I didn't realise that was the Coventry Automatics though. In those days it seemed to be more common for the support bands to go on and make a career, especially with things like the Two Tone tours. They used to have the running order based on chart position of any releases they had, so I remember going to a gig with 4 bands on and the opening act was Dexy's Midnight Runners, behind bands like the Bodysnatchers  and Selecter which seems bizarre in hindsight.

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Quote

 

I've got a copy of this if anyone wants it finally finished reading it over Xmas not really my cup of tea but I'm sure others will have more of an interest. If anyone wants to pay the postage you can have it for nothing as I only get down the Gate a couple of times a season these days.

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On 03/08/2018 at 22:55, freezer said:

There were quite a few grammatical errors though that detracted from the impact of the read. No excuse for that really, but thats not down to the provider of the book rather the publisher.

One particular point that annoyed me was when The Hen & Chicken was mentioned as being in West Street! Really, as a Bemmie Boy that's shocking. I could of proof read better.

 

Fair play to you Lumbs for opening up and having the balls to create this. 

 

Agree with @freezer I reckon the publisher etc let down the author a bit as there were a few "typos" within the book that they really should have noticed before printing, and also a few errors like the example above, but lets be honest this could be like this in most books but we don't normally have any knowledge on the areas mentioned.

I found it an interesting read, there are many names that I have heard fondly remembered, it was also nice to read a book about City in the 70's and 80's as this was before my time.

Rightly or wrongly things went on in those days, and often if it wasn't for these people standing up for other supporters, more "innocent" supporters would have had problems

I have since had the chance to meet the author in a local boozer and he was a really nice guy too, so fair play to him for putting in the time and effort for this publication

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On 03/08/2018 at 22:55, freezer said:

I also read it on holiday. It's the only time that I do read a book.

I found it engrossing and couldn't wait to get to the next chapter.

There were quite a few grammatical errors though that detracted from the impact of the read. No excuse for that really, but thats not down to the provider of the book rather the publisher.

One particular point that annoyed me was when The Hen & Chicken was mentioned as being in West Street! Really, as a Bemmie Boy that's shocking. I could of proof read better.

Anyways, I really enjoyed the read overall. It captivated me. 

I can understand that it won't be to everyone's taste. And I don't in any way condone the violence, but thing's did happen then in a way that thankfully won't happen again, hopefully but the world is a messy place.

Also so sad to hear of people I knew that have passed, Acid particularly.

It wasn't until I got to the end of the book and read all the names mentioned - lots of many happy memories and education as a young un - that I then really understood how much of an influence and impact that this could of had on me. But then again, that's the course I chose to follow. 

Luckily, I think I skirted it.

As the great MJ said, I'm a lover not a fighter

Fair play to you Lumbs for opening up and having the balls to create this. 

 

I would of been a lover and not a fighter,but had a bit of an ugly mug.

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On 01/07/2016 at 21:48, GasDestroyer said:

This thread makes me realise just how false football is nowadays.  I still go down but it ain't like it used to be. 

It ain't like it used to be because of what it used to be like. At least in part. As this book no doubt illustrates.

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Came across an interesting podcast on These Football Times.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-wb2ye-55e9f45

Political context, battle- hooliganism, Thatcher- any relevance to hooliganism or a red herring? Combines football, politics, society etc- backdrop. Uses the word "protest" at times.

Edited by Mr Popodopolous

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4 minutes ago, Mr Popodopolous said:

Came across an interesting podcast on These Football Times.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-wb2ye-55e9f45

Political context, battle- hooliganism, Thatcher- any relevance to hooliganism or a red herring?

I would personally say no relevance whatsoever.

Thatcher came into power in 79 and violence had been in full flow at football for about 10 years by then.

I can recall hardly any political context associated with having a row apart from a few gasheads being members of the BNP.

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For me, the 80s was about football, music and culture behind it.  

Infact when the rave scene hit, a lot stopped going to football and started going to all night raves. 

The policing of football matches allowed a different approach to away fans descending on your home ground and taking the piss etc.. E.g. No CCTV, no Intel, no banning orders, (unti Thatcher kicked off with Moynihan etc).

Regardless of how good/bad the book is to read, it does describe the culture behind football well. Just my opinion, but I know PL well and I enjoyed the book. Brought back some good memories. There is a bit of creative writing in parts, but it is worth a read.

Wheres my Royalties Lumb?

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41 minutes ago, GasDestroyer said:

For me, the 80s was about football, music and culture behind it.  

Infact when the rave scene hit, a lot stopped going to football and started going to all night raves. 

The policing of football matches allowed a different approach to away fans descending on your home ground and taking the piss etc.. E.g. No CCTV, no Intel, no banning orders, (unti Thatcher kicked off with Moynihan etc).

Regardless of how good/bad the book is to read, it does describe the culture behind football well. Just my opinion, but I know PL well and I enjoyed the book. Brought back some good memories. There is a bit of creative writing in parts, but it is worth a read.

Wheres my Royalties Lumb?

Forgot about Moynihan, otherwise known as the miniature of sport

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On 18/02/2018 at 17:39, Sixtyseconds said:

Specials were Coventry.

These WERE Bristol City.

Down the town it's Friday night
See a band get in a fight
Flash of steel, end of fun
Growing up has just begun

More young blood, every night, ok
Life down the drain
More young blood, every night, ok
Isn't it a shame
More young blood, every night, ok
Spilt in the streets
More young blood, every night

Down to football here we go
Tried to find last years foe
They live behind a different scarf
So we fight them for a laugh

More young blood, every night, ok
Life down the drain
More young blood, every night, ok
Isn't it a shame

Vice Squad

Lead singer Beki Bondage - I liked her...

 

117D95E1-3077-4ACF-9C67-01CBCAF51215.jpeg

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5 hours ago, Loon plage said:

I would personally say no relevance whatsoever.

Thatcher came into power in 79 and violence had been in full flow at football for about 10 years by then.

I can recall hardly any political context associated with having a row apart from a few gasheads being members of the BNP.

Yeah good point..did wonder as I was listening to it why it mentioned Thatcher given it (trouble had football) had gone on since late 60's, early 70's. Was still an interesting podcast though.

Ironically, think a lot involved in that world (not talking any club in particular, just football troublemakers as such) would have fairly been pro Thatcherite anyway- but it did make point that football certainly in industrial/post industrial areas mirrored life in some respects.

This book itself? Never involved in that world but it sounds interesting, might get it.

Edited by Mr Popodopolous

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7 hours ago, Mr Popodopolous said:

Yeah good point..did wonder as I was listening to it why it mentioned Thatcher given it (trouble had football) had gone on since late 60's, early 70's. Was still an interesting podcast though.

Ironically, think a lot involved in that world (not talking any club in particular, just football troublemakers as such) would have fairly been pro Thatcherite anyway- but it did make point that football certainly in industrial/post industrial areas mirrored life in some respects.

This book itself? Never involved in that world but it sounds interesting, might get it.

Good point about the majority of "lads" being pro Thatcher, certainly around 1982.

The book isn't as well written as some although it is more honest than many, but Paul is a top chap and worked really hard to get the thing published. He has done some new work which is actually better but not sure whether he's looking to get that published.

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Loon some of the chaps in PL's book were VERY left wing and took their windmilling and skirmishing tactics onto demos and anti Thatch activity.

Theres a great story out there about Pompey 657 being hired by a hunt as security.

Bristol sabs turn up with CSF chaps ready to windmill.

The outcome the chaps knew each other and buggered off for a shant as Pompey call it.

The Hunt's vehicles got what the foxs get ...

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Not read the book so can’t comment on that. 

However, I used to work with a chap in the 1990s - a very professional and hard working - mild mannered bloke who wouldn’t say boo to a goose. And a City fan  

That is until Saturday came around - particularly when it came to our local rivals. His eyes would glaze over when the Gas were mentioned. He proudly boasted to me once that him and his mates caught a gas head after a local derby match, beat the living sh!t out of him, before throwing him off Bedminster bridge into the river. When I told him that was a long drop and he could have died, his genuinely felt belief was that he didn’t care - the bloke deserved it for being a gashead - and justified it by saying that the gashead would have done the same to him. 

I never saw him in the same light again  - whenever I saw him I saw a thug  

It beggars belief that there are people like that living in our community with any affiliation to  our club. 

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1 hour ago, Sixtyseconds said:

Loon some of the chaps in PL's book were VERY left wing and took their windmilling and skirmishing tactics onto demos and anti Thatch activity.

Theres a great story out there about Pompey 657 being hired by a hunt as security.

Bristol sabs turn up with CSF chaps ready to windmill.

The outcome the chaps knew each other and buggered off for a shant as Pompey call it.

The Hunt's vehicles got what the foxs get ...

Everyone I went with were and still are left of centre.

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10 minutes ago, bcfcredandwhite said:

Not read the book so can’t comment on that. 

However, I used to work with a chap in the 1990s - a very professional and hard working - mild mannered bloke who wouldn’t say boo to a goose. And a City fan  

That is until Saturday came around - particularly when it came to our local rivals. His eyes would glaze over when the Gas were mentioned. He proudly boasted to me once that him and his mates caught a gas head after a local derby match, beat the living sh!t out of him, before throwing him off Bedminster bridge into the river. When I told him that was a long drop and he could have died, his genuinely felt belief was that he didn’t care - the bloke deserved it for being a gashead - and justified it by saying that the gashead would have done the same to him. 

I never saw him in the same light again  - whenever I saw him I saw a thug  

It beggars belief that there are people like that living in our community with any affiliation to  our club. 

Ain't heard that before.......

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1 hour ago, Sixtyseconds said:

Loon some of the chaps in PL's book were VERY left wing and took their windmilling and skirmishing tactics onto demos and anti Thatch activity.

Theres a great story out there about Pompey 657 being hired by a hunt as security.

Bristol sabs turn up with CSF chaps ready to windmill.

The outcome the chaps knew each other and buggered off for a shant as Pompey call it.

The Hunt's vehicles got what the foxs get ...

Haha mint tale.

 

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3 hours ago, Loon plage said:

Good point about the majority of "lads" being pro Thatcher, certainly around 1982.

The book isn't as well written as some although it is more honest than many, but Paul is a top chap and worked really hard to get the thing published. He has done some new work which is actually better but not sure whether he's looking to get that published.

I spoke to him briefly after one of the home games over Xmas and he gave the impression he was looking to get the new stuff out there. Wait and see I guess

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44 minutes ago, Kid in the Riot said:

I spoke to him briefly after one of the home games over Xmas and he gave the impression he was looking to get the new stuff out there. Wait and see I guess

A bit on FB mate.

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1 hour ago, bcfcredandwhite said:

Not read the book so can’t comment on that. 

However, I used to work with a chap in the 1990s - a very professional and hard working - mild mannered bloke who wouldn’t say boo to a goose. And a City fan  

That is until Saturday came around - particularly when it came to our local rivals. His eyes would glaze over when the Gas were mentioned. He proudly boasted to me once that him and his mates caught a gas head after a local derby match, beat the living sh!t out of him, before throwing him off Bedminster bridge into the river. When I told him that was a long drop and he could have died, his genuinely felt belief was that he didn’t care - the bloke deserved it for being a gashead - and justified it by saying that the gashead would have done the same to him. 

I never saw him in the same light again  - whenever I saw him I saw a thug  

It beggars belief that there are people like that living in our community with any affiliation to  our club. 

The lads I hung about with in the 80s contained qualified accountants, owner of successful businesses and the rest  ..........

Never judge a book by its cover - as the saying goes.

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8 minutes ago, GasDestroyer said:

The lads I hung about with in the 80s contained qualified accountants, owner of successful businesses and the rest  ..........

Never judge a book by its cover - as the saying goes.

People always have the idea in their heads of working class unemployed bald men with polo necks on and tattoos all over themselves when they think of football hooligans.

Reality is very different.

Edited by ZiderEyed
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42 minutes ago, ZiderEyed said:

People always have the idea in their heads of working class unemployed bald men with polo necks on and tattoos all over themselves when they think of football hooligans.

Reality is very different.

You are right Zider....apparently this guy was one of the top boys in Prestons firm back in the day.

933626710_download(2).jpeg.298763338b3f0c46a8c3bc801a2747db.jpeg

Edited by Top Robin
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As an outsider looking in, I can well believe that. Planning covertly, ducking surveillance, police intelligence suggests a decent degree of intelligence too.

Economically? Reckon yeah pretty middling and well off people, but not exclusively- won't there be those who are skinheads, perhaps with far right sympathies (not suggesting all skinheads are far right or all far right are skint, bit of a broad brush) too? Pretty sure Chelsea hooligans in the 1980s, though likely middle class or upwards economically- well they had a rep for strongly hard right views let's say, Millwall too though perhaps a bit less flush economically. It probably can vary between clubs and areas too. Interested to read that there were City lads who were left of centre though.

Pretty complex picture I imagine, looking at it nationally. Lots of variations no doubt.

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Honestly the worst book I've ever read.  I couldn't get past the kicking a police dog for fun part.  Blokes complete scum (based on the book) IMO.  Who kicks an animal like a dog for fun? 

 

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3 hours ago, Mr Popodopolous said:

As an outsider looking in, I can well believe that. Planning covertly, ducking surveillance, police intelligence suggests a decent degree of intelligence too.

Economically? Reckon yeah pretty middling and well off people, but not exclusively- won't there be those who are skinheads, perhaps with far right sympathies (not suggesting all skinheads are far right or all far right are skint, bit of a broad brush) too? Pretty sure Chelsea hooligans in the 1980s, though likely middle class or upwards economically- well they had a rep for strongly hard right views let's say, Millwall too though perhaps a bit less flush economically. It probably can vary between clubs and areas too. Interested to read that there were City lads who were left of centre though.

Pretty complex picture I imagine, looking at it nationally. Lots of variations no doubt.

My older brother, now in his 60's, was very "involved" with the football in the 70's, and was pretty Left wing, I asked him one day a few years ago why he supported City over the Gas as we grew up in Northern Bristol , his answer was because he hated their right wing, NF racist support.

  Btw does anyone else remember the red and white goalposts at Eastville?, I think one of the best football related wind ups ever :laugh:

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5 hours ago, ZiderEyed said:

People always have the idea in their heads of working class unemployed bald men with polo necks on and tattoos all over themselves when they think of football hooligans.

Reality is very different.

You’re quite right. Criminality doesn’t have a class. 

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