Jump to content

Welcome to One Team in Bristol - Bristol City Forums

Welcome to One Team in Bristol - Bristol City Forums, like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be a part of One Team in Bristol - Bristol City Forums by signing in or creating an account.

  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Full access to all forums (not all viewable as guest)
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members.
  • Support OTIB with a premium membership

It all kicked off in Bristol (Merged)


Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Paul Lumber said:

Football was always about taunting the other fans that was part of the atmosphere, that was what football was all about, many parents took there kids to football week in week out no full well what the atmosphere would be like, and I'm sorry as far as I am concerned the local residents shouldn't of bought a housea right next to a football stadium, it would be a bit like buying a house next door to a airport then complaining that airplanespecially are flying over all the i

Sorry but I don't buy this.  DOn't take your kids to a football match unless you are happy for them to be threatened and intimidated? Don't buy a house near a football ground because you might get beaten up by thugs?  So if anyone gets jumped walking down North Street on a Saturday its their own fault for being near a football ground?  Come on...

I'm sure it's true that some people enjoying being violent thugs, but then there are people who enjoy a whole range of disturbing and sadistic activity.  That doesn't make it right.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, spudski said:

Mate...how can you say I haven't been part of it, when you haven't been with me. I've stood with the Lazio Ultras on the Curva Nord, and followed them against Roma, Napoli, Atalanta to name a few...where it's all kicked off. Police charging in Riot gear, Batons, flares, Stabbings, beatings etc. Seen it and been amongst it with City...and like you at Cardiff.

I looked after myself...didn't need to run with them and get involved...but stood up to them. Didn't back down and those around me did the same. Funny when they don't like it one on one either.

I don't need others to do it for me... Yes I've been 'smacked'...but he got it harder back. Can't remember seeing him get up tbh. His fellow lemmings dragged him off.

And there are a lot like me, that will stand up for themselves when these idiots come looking for it. You don't need to be part of it, to look after yourself. The difference is...I don't go looking for it. I go to enjoy watching football.

Violence is for people too thick to talk, debate and have banter without losing self control.

Stand up for yourself Phantom...you'll be surprised what you can do if you need to ;-)

What I meant was you haven't been part of the "firm" that went to games wanting to fight etc, yeah we've all been "caught up" in situations at various football matches over the years, many more than I can remember

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, spudski said:

Mate...how can you say I haven't been part of it, when you haven't been with me. I've stood with the Lazio Ultras on the Curva Nord, and followed them against Roma, Napoli, Atalanta to name a few...where it's all kicked off. Police charging in Riot gear, Batons, flares, Stabbings, beatings etc. Seen it and been amongst it with City...and like you at Cardiff.

I looked after myself...didn't need to run with them and get involved...

Sounds like you were involved and running with them and bang at it.

went to Italy twice with England and their ultras are cowardly shit bags who targeted anybody and got destroyed by Englands firm. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, BigTone said:

Can I ask a question ?  Not trying to be smart or anything but how old are you ?

Tone; there is a caveat to your "each to their own" statement. It is: "as long as it doesn't hurt others".

I think that's the point being made here.

Edited by Pheasant plucker
Sausage fingers!
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SARJ said:

tt's a hard sensation to describe unless you're involved.

Not a football hooligan but am an amateur boxer. I love bouts and sparring. The adrenaline, the violence, pride and the great feeling afterwards. Completely understand how some hoolies enjoy it. When you say 'punching people in the face' or 'kicking peoples heads in' yeah it seems strange to read it like that, but it's true, very weird but great feeling.

Again, not for everyone, courses for horses I say. World would be boring if everyone were the same.

I will have a pop.

Its a higher state of consciousness but not of the Josh Wink type ... Higher than that.

Adrenalin, testosterone, endorphins and dopamine ... Every fibre and nerve is energised.

Euphoric.

Feeling like you can fly.

No other gig comes close.

Nothing. 

That is what its like to beat an opponent.

To fight.

Hooligans will be feeling a similar alchemy.

 

Edited by Sixtyseconds
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Trueredsupporte said:

Sounds like you were involved and running with them and bang at it.

went to Italy twice with England and their ultras are cowardly shit bags who targeted anybody and got destroyed by Englands firm. 

Not at all fella...Unfortunately in Italy, it's very often hard to avoid situations. The Police really don't care and will attack anyone...bystander or not. You get attacked for just attending a game or being in the away support.

Much of the Ultra problems stem from Drugs and social problems.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Pheasant plucker said:

Tone; there is a caveat to your "each to their own" statement. It is: "as long as it doesn't hurt others".

I think that's the point being made here.

I agree with that but to compare it with Robbers, Rapists and Murderers as Leveller has done is just going OTT. I ask the question of age to get some idea of what generation he grew up in. Football violence can be dated back to the 1880's and is not confined to Britain in any shape or form. It is something I was not involved in as to me it was just futile, however  look at the generations in the past and we have Mods, Rockers, Punks, Skinheads, Teds etc etc not all of which were attributed to football and they still created havoc. What's the difference between Cardiff and Bristol City fighting at Ashton Gate to the Mods and Rockers fighting on Brighton Beach ?  Beats the crap out of me.  I'm not here to judge anyone because I do not know their social background and how they were influenced in their early years through whatever circumstances to become what they became. I will read Pauls book and make my own conclusions. Some will like the book and some will not ................... each to their own.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, spudski said:

You would be better off reading a book by Desmond Morris...'The Soccer Tribe'....a sociological study of football hooliganism.

It takes a certain type of 'wiring' to be involved. In short...if we were back fighting in trenches, they'd be perfect cannon fodder ;-)

 

I read that book 30 plus years ago, it’s about as relevant as the bible is nowadays.

A lot of the lads I know that were involved in the scene, were far from the sort who would have been ‘cannon fodder’.

You would be very surprised, believe me.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Portland Bill said:

tI read that book 30 plus years ago, it’s about as relevant as the bible is nowadays.

A lot of the lads I know that were involved in the scene, were far from the sort who would have been ‘cannon fodder’.

You would be very surprised, believe me.

 

Probably wont make the print.

Bristol City chaps went from the unemployed to GP's to Services to CEO's.

GP's ... Slap them up Saturday ... Sign em off Monday.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Paul Lumber said:

Most lads who were called up in the Falklands war, Afghanistan had connection with football firms before they were sent off to fight, one minute there called football hooligans and thugs then when they come back from conflict those same people who don't understand it all the sudden want to stick a medal on there chest, you could go on and on and like I've said if you don't understand it then you never will, but then you would understand very quickly if a load of Millwall come running into the stand and stated to put it about you and our firm come to the rescue and saved you from a kicking, we would be defending you would that be so hard to understand then.

Football hooligans are apart of any clubs history, it's a fact of life.

I remember the Millwall hoolies gatecrashing the Corinthian Casuals game, and I fear that if the City firm hadn't lept into action a lot of innocents would have got hurt that day. 

Although I hasten to add that it wasn't only hooligans that ran over to where Millwall were. My old man told me get off the terrace and hide whilst he went over to help out. 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Shuffle said:

I read the book and found it fascinating as nearly all the games discussed I attended. I also know a number of people mentioned in the book and know that they all are passionate supporters of our club from a pure football perspective. Being involved in the CSF doesn't make you any less a supporter & whilst you might not agree with violence you cannot take the moral high ground as ultimately you can avoid trouble and walk away, whilst others walk to it. It's choices that we all have!!

Exactly that, just because I may be a hooligan/or was doesn't mean that I am not a supporter, or more precisely, not as much as a supporter than someone who has home and away replica shirts and a City duvet cover, there is no barometer for support, or at least there shouldn't be.

I remain anonymous on this board and that works for me, as someone whos been an exile from an early age, it wasn't particularly easy to be known by the older lads (Im 42), I had to pick my games as I had to pay for trains to Bristol from London and for a good while Cardiff. So as you can imagine I had some proper nasty situations as my allegiance was common knowledge and I didn't have a normal "job" as such so I was fair game for a lot of the Soul Crews dick head element, although most of their top lads were completely sound and I remain good friends with a few of them. (Im not talking about any of the ********* who have written any bullshit books). @Paullumber  we've talked about those bell ends on Facebook pal

Their proper lads all give City the utmost respect, the ones who don't are only lying to themselves.

I think it was 2013 at their place, the mob we had was huge and I don't think there would have been a mob in the country that could have touched us that day, I went around the corner to one of their pubs to see a mate of mine, one of their top lads and I went in to the pub and inside were 30 of their lads, all top blokes and they were agreed that they hadn't seen such a mob since Spurs visited them in the FA Cup.  

Its only since the days of social media and in particular Facebook that a lot of people that knew me, and I knew them by sight are now putting names to faces.

I haven't half rambled on and sorry for anyone who has read all that, Im not really sure where I was going with all this but, Ive been arrested quite a few times during my life, a few of those have been football associated and one was very recent, of all the things ive risked my freedom and liberty doing, the ones connected to Bristol City and the CSF are the ones I would do exactly the same again, sometimes a banning order is a blessing when Bristol City is the team you follow!

 

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Enjoying the book, on chapter 23 at the moment.

Being the same age as the author, I remember a lot of the games written about, the Old East end as well as the two gigs at the Locarno and the Granary, although I didn't see the Cockney rejects, it got a big write up in the EP. I had The Greatest Hits Vol 1.

I gotta say Paul Lumber certainly was dedicated.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

We can go around and round in circles on this one, and everyone is intitaled to there opinion, one I do disagree with most is the comment about becoming a hooligan because your from a broken home, that is total bullshit, I and many other like minded individuals throughout the country become addicted not just to football violence but the whole Casual culture, normal lads and weather people like it or not our club was Bristol city, and the CSF will always be apart of the club's history, a dark side maybe but it is the way it was, but that was then and this is now, and what a good advertising for the club for the progress it's made over the years in tackling it and making it the family club it is today.

I haven’t wrote a book as an explanation for those who don't understand any of it or as away of explanation or even any form of appolgey because I can't give you any.

I think any genuine Bristol city fans will want to read it, out of interest I've shared my memories of true events of The City Service Firm a hooligan firm associated to Bristol City Football Club, no one ishould forcing anyone to buy it, but if you do I will accept your criticism, if you don't then you shouldn't criticise something you know **** all about.

 

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Paul Lumber said:

We can go around and round in circles on this one, and everyone is intitaled to there opinion, one I do disagree with most is the comment about becoming a hooligan because your from a broken home, that is total bullshit, I and many other like minded individuals throughout the country become addicted not just to football violence but the whole Casual culture, normal lads and weather people like it or not our club was Bristol city, and the CSF will always be apart of the club's history, a dark side maybe but it is the way it was, but that was then and this is now, and what a good advertising for the club for the progress it's made over the years in tackling it and making it the family club it is today.

I haven’t wrote a book as an explanation for those who don't understand any of it or as away of explanation or even any form of appolgey because I can't give you any.

I think any genuine Bristol city fans will want to read it, out of interest I've shared my memories of true events of The City Service Firm a hooligan firm associated to Bristol City Football Club, no one ishould forcing anyone to buy it, but if you do I will accept your criticism, if you don't then you shouldn't criticise something you know **** all about.

 

Cracking firm Paul, Weston back in the summer proved that. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Paul Lumber said:

We can go around and round in circles on this one, and everyone is intitaled to there opinion, one I do disagree with most is the comment about becoming a hooligan because your from a broken home, that is total bullshit, I and many other like minded individuals throughout the country become addicted not just to football violence but the whole Casual culture, normal lads and weather people like it or not our club was Bristol city, and the CSF will always be apart of the club's history, a dark side maybe but it is the way it was, but that was then and this is now, and what a good advertising for the club for the progress it's made over the years in tackling it and making it the family club it is today.

I haven’t wrote a book as an explanation for those who don't understand any of it or as away of explanation or even any form of appolgey because I can't give you any.

I think any genuine Bristol city fans will want to read it, out of interest I've shared my memories of true events of The City Service Firm a hooligan firm associated to Bristol City Football Club, no one ishould forcing anyone to buy it, but if you do I will accept your criticism, if you don't then you shouldn't criticise something you know **** all about.

 

Incorrect, over the years many many innocent people have been caught up in this nonsense, it wrong and it always will be wrong, its stupid and always will be stupid, and its illegal and always will be illegal.   There is no debate to be had.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, spudski said:

It's a kop out to say 'You won't understand if you've never been in it'.

I've 'been in it'...

Football hooliganism can be looked upon as an extreme adrenalin driven sport. The extreme activity leads to the individual being taken mentally and physically to a state where the mind and body will operate in a altogether unique state. The buzz hooligans refer to can only be achieved by being part of that extreme activity and its associated subsequent mental/physical state. This is how the brain works

So its no kop out to state "you won't understand". 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Cowshed said:

Football hooliganism can be looked upon as an extreme adrenalin driven sport. The extreme activity leads to the individual being taken mentally and physically to a state where the mind and body will operate in a altogether unique state. The buzz hooligans refer to can only be achieved by being part of that extreme activity and its associated subsequent mental/physical state. This is how the brain works

So its no kop out to state "you won't understand". 

 

I think the fact that the only people who would agree with that are football hooligans, probably negates that argument. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, BRISTOL86 said:

I think the fact that the only people who would agree with that are football hooligans, probably negates that argument. 

People who agree with it are learned professionals.

Have a think about an alternative. Climber James Kingston. The rest of us cannot comprehend how he feels and what the attraction truly is because we cannot do it. His activity is so stress inducing and fearful to most that they would not attempt it. He thrives within his extreme activity. His incredibly dangerous sport leads his mind to work in a manner the rest us cannot experience because we will never go so far out of our own comfort zone. This is how the brain works.

Edited by Cowshed
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Cowshed said:

People who agree with it are learned professionals.

Have a think about an alternative. Climber James Kingston. The rest of us cannot comprehend how he feels and what the attraction truly is because we cannot do it. His activity is so stress inducing and fearful to most that they would not attempt it. He thrives within his extreme activity. His incredibly dangerous sport leads his mind to work in a manner the rest us cannot experience because we will never go so far out of our own comfort zone. This is how the brain works.

Climbing and wanting to beat the crap out of someone because they don't support the same team as you are vastly different things.

 

You can get an adrenaline rush from other things, if extreme climbing isn't your thing then there are plenty of alternatives that don't require being a knuckle-dragging neanderthal.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Cowshed said:

People who agree with it are learned professionals.

Have a think about an alternative. Climber James Kingston. The rest of us cannot comprehend how he feels and what the attraction truly is because we cannot do it. His activity is so stress inducing and fearful to most that they would not attempt it. He thrives within his extreme activity. His incredibly dangerous sport leads his mind to work in a manner the rest us cannot experience because we will never go so far out of our own comfort zone. This is how the brain works.

This is truly ridiculous. Facile self-justification. No doubt you'd feel the same after pulling off a bank job or the great train robbery. 

When it all boils down to it, the author of the book has got it spot on - people do it because they "like kicking people's heads in

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Paul Lumber said:

We can go around and round in circles on this one, and everyone is intitaled to there opinion, one I do disagree with most is the comment about becoming a hooligan because your from a broken home, that is total bullshit, I and many other like minded individuals throughout the country become addicted not just to football violence but the whole Casual culture, normal lads and weather people like it or not our club was Bristol city, and the CSF will always be apart of the club's history, a dark side maybe but it is the way it was, but that was then and this is now, and what a good advertising for the club for the progress it's made over the years in tackling it and making it the family club it is today.

I haven’t wrote a book as an explanation for those who don't understand any of it or as away of explanation or even any form of appolgey because I can't give you any.

I think any genuine Bristol city fans will want to read it, out of interest I've shared my memories of true events of The City Service Firm a hooligan firm associated to Bristol City Football Club, no one ishould forcing anyone to buy it, but if you do I will accept your criticism, if you don't then you shouldn't criticise something you know **** all about.

 

Away from any debate over the merit of the subject matter of the book itself, you must have kept your editor awake at night Paul.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

@jamesbcfc @CyderInACan

Different extremes. That is the point. The author does have it spot on. Because the normal reaction to something that is unpleasant is to take flight, avoid it, not wilfully and happily take part. Yes they enjoy it in the manner others enjoy extreme sports that are too stress inducing for the rest of us to envisage ever doing. 

 

 

 

Edited by Cowshed
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Cowshed said:

People who agree with it are learned professionals.

Have a think about an alternative. Climber James Kingston. The rest of us cannot comprehend how he feels and what the attraction truly is because we cannot do it. His activity is so stress inducing and fearful to most that they would not attempt it. He thrives within his extreme activity. His incredibly dangerous sport leads his mind to work in a manner the rest us cannot experience because we will never go so far out of our own comfort zone. This is how the brain works.

There is no comparison to be drawn between pushing yourself to the limits physically and mentally though extreme sport, and getting off on kicking someone’s head in. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...