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It all kicked off in Bristol (Merged)


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1 hour ago, In the Net said:

Not condoning violence at all, but I have to confess that there were a couple of occasions when I was relieved to see our "nutters" appear over the horizon.

Were they lost with the sun in their eyes 🤣

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3 hours ago, Ciderhead433 said:

Dont be so thick we all done it never said it was right but we were kids in gangs i think i come from a different world than you 

I can assure you that we haven’t all done it. Don’t try and justify your participation by pretending that everyone was involved. If your world involved kicking shit out of people for fun, I actually feel quite sorry for you. 

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3 hours ago, Ciderhead433 said:

Dont be so thick we all done it never said it was right but we were kids in gangs i think i come from a different world than you 

That world... I am going to guess it isn't Planet Punctuation.

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1 hour ago, CyderInACan said:

I can assure you that we haven’t all done it. Don’t try and justify your participation by pretending that everyone was involved. If your world involved kicking shit out of people for fun, I actually feel quite sorry for you. 

As i said your from a different world to me hope you enjoy your prawn sandwich. 

Im not condoning what i done 50 years ago when a teen im just trying to explain how i felt and reacted like others have.

 

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12 hours ago, Ciderhead433 said:

As i said your from a different world to me hope you enjoy your prawn sandwich. 

Im not condoning what i done 50 years ago when a teen im just trying to explain how i felt and reacted like others have.

 

I'm far from a member of the Prawn Sandwich Brigade I promise you, I've just never seen the attraction of violence for the sake of it - whether that is at football, in town on a friday night etc etc 

At least you're not, as you say, condoning it and it was a long time ago. Enjoy your day COYR :city:

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You also need to remember that back in the 80s & 90s, life was a lot different in England..

The country was In a deep recession in the 80s. Not making excuses but high unemployment, the recession, Falklands War, miners strike and everything else that was going on was a recipe that bred a violent society. Football became a way of offloading that aggression each weekend to Britains bored youth. 

Thatcher & Moynihan made it a key political agenda also and well, the rest is history as we exported what we were good at - football violence. When the rave scene came around in mid 90s, we all had a “love in” and started going to Friday all night raves and just chilled out on the Saturday.

Funny how society works through history?

 

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35 minutes ago, GasDestroyer said:

You also need to remember that back in the 80s & 90s, life was a lot different in England..

The country was In a deep recession in the 80s. Not making excuses but high unemployment, the recession, Falklands War, miners strike and everything else that was going on was a recipe that bred a violent society. Football became a way of offloading that aggression each weekend to Britains bored youth. 

Thatcher & Moynihan made it a key political agenda also and well, the rest is history as we exported what we were good at - football violence. When the rave scene came around in mid 90s, we all had a “love in” and started going to Friday all night raves and just chilled out on the Saturday.

Funny how society works through history?

 

Good points you make about how society changed during that period for many reasons which also coincided with the popularity of skinheads who often carried their culture onto the football terraces in the early 80's 

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20 hours ago, Ciderhead433 said:

Dont be so thick we all done it never said it was right but we were kids in gangs i think i come from a different world than you 

Sometimes very young kids.

I remember walking along Ashton Road after a match against Southampton in the old Div. 1 days and seeing a Southampton fan (presumably) flat out in the park near the toilets.

His assailants had gone but 4 or 5 kids no more than 10 years old ran over to 'put the boot in'.

Very different world in the 70's.

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42 minutes ago, Nogbad the Bad said:

Sometimes very young kids.

I remember walking along Ashton Road after a match against Southampton in the old Div. 1 days and seeing a Southampton fan (presumably) flat out in the park near the toilets.

His assailants had gone but 4 or 5 kids no more than 10 years old ran over to 'put the boot in'.

Very different world in the 70's.

It was bad just glad i grew out of it.by me early 20s 

 

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7 hours ago, GasDestroyer said:

Bristol City in the 80s was a well respected firm by most English clubs. Some good wins, some bad losses also.

There was noone at the top actually “organising” the Saturdays per say, but there were 6 or so lads from across Bristol (south & north)/Bath/Taunton etc who will remain nameless on here (but those ITK will know them) who collectively could pull together 200+ good City lads on any given game to take it to the other side’s firm when they knew they were coming to town. Or we were going away. Barton Hill, Knowle West (The Venture pub), Kingswood, Hanham, Whitchurch all had good numbers. Not just Bedminster.

Quite often the away games were the best because you had an element of surprise on your side. Problem was that quite often City were not that well organised on away games in the early days and big mobs just got rounded up by the OB. 20/30 game lads could cause more havoc than 100+ with hangers on. The Millwall incident on Cumberland road was one example of this that is well documented.

Yes, things happened not to be proud off, but in all honesty, the camaraderie in those days was like a 2nd family (Bristol City was a close knit club after the 1982 “nearly going bust” saga) and many of those fans who have long passed, fans will still feel for just like a family member as many were close mates. Lumber lists many that have passed at the back of the book.

The book by Lumber is a good read and tells some good stories and some bad ones also. But fair play to Paul for getting it printed. There are many young’uns on OTIB who won’t have a scooby doo what happened in the 80s/90s and this book gives a good insight/recollection of some of them.

The Rovers Eastville story and “changing the locks” ...........

Not just the 80's mate, we still have that same respect by the firms that matter to this day.

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I liked it. Some good stories. Yeah kicking dogs is not a great look, however the book was ok. It’s not Tolstoy so I overlooked the style and if it was ghost written the ghost was only semi literate. 
 

There were some things that I thought were plain wrong and other bits that were embellished and a few that were missing. But I guess Her Maj had a hand in that. 
 

stories from a different time. The locks at Eastville was hilarious. 
 

However I note a lot of posts saying 80s n 90s. I can go as far back as Cardiff at home in the late 60s and pretty much all of the 70s as a youngster. Some shit back then was a lot worse. The 80s was always fun as we were so shit we only had the punch up. After losing away again my old man would always say ‘yeah! But we won the punch up!’

That was the time it was!

Edited by REDOXO
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5 hours ago, REDOXO said:

I liked it. Some good stories. Yeah kicking dogs is not a great look, however the book was ok. It’s not Tolstoy so I overlooked the style and if it was ghost written the ghost was only semi literate. 
 

There were some things that I thought were plain wrong and other bits that were embellished and a few that were missing. But I guess Her Maj had a hand in that. 
 

stories from a different time. The locks at Eastville was hilarious. 
 

However I note a lot of posts saying 80s n 90s. I can go as far back as Cardiff at home in the late 60s and pretty much all of the 70s as a youngster. Some shit back then was a lot worse. The 80s was always fun as we were so shit we only had the punch up. After losing away again my old man would always say ‘yeah! But we won the punch up!’

That was the time it was!

The early seventies were crazy

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1 hour ago, Nicki's soulmate said:

The early seventies were crazy

Yep. 

The Police had no numbers and little organisation then. No escorts or segregation and freedom pretty much to do as you pleased in and outside grounds.

Needed to be pretty street-wise in those days, quite a few dodgy moments has to be said. Seemed we were far from the best organised, but generally had the numbers when it mattered.

 

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10 hours ago, YorkshireSection said:

Not just the 80's mate, we still have that same respect by the firms that matter to this day.

 

17 hours ago, GasDestroyer said:

quite often City were not that well organised on away games

The Rovers Eastville story and “changing the locks” ...........

The first line is a phrase I have heard mention in bars around this country still today

The locks story, whilst many I appreciate wont like what happened, it is simply genius and if happened in a film people would say that would never happen

 

To me the book is what it is, of course we know there are those have their feelings against all that went on, but it did happen and whilst the book has its flaws some of the stories were interesting to read, and more so when names etc are people that I recognise.

I think it is unfair to pick out the actual writing at least he gave it a go. I have read many similar books over the years and was glad there was a City version written.

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The. Worst books I’ve ever read are by the brimson brothers who say they fallow Watford. They bang on about england away quite a lot and yet iv never seen either of them in the years iv been going . A right pair of tools these two seem to be and if memory severs me one was even on breakfast tv one morning.... now I don’t think any of the people mentioned in this book would be that keen on sitting on the coach with graham on points west at 6.30 in the evening.....would you ?

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22 hours ago, GasDestroyer said:

Bristol City in the 80s was a well respected firm by most English clubs. Some good wins, some bad losses also.

There was noone at the top actually “organising” the Saturdays per say, but there were 6 or so lads from across Bristol (south & north)/Bath/Taunton etc who will remain nameless on here (but those ITK will know them) who collectively could pull together 200+ good City lads on any given game to take it to the other side’s firm when they knew they were coming to town. Or we were going away. Barton Hill, Knowle West (The Venture pub), Kingswood, Hanham, Whitchurch all had good numbers. Not just Bedminster.

Quite often the away games were the best because you had an element of surprise on your side. Problem was that quite often City were not that well organised on away games in the early days and big mobs just got rounded up by the OB. 20/30 game lads could cause more havoc than 100+ with hangers on. The Millwall incident on Cumberland road was one example of this that is well documented.

Yes, things happened not to be proud off, but in all honesty, the camaraderie in those days was like a 2nd family (Bristol City was a close knit club after the 1982 “nearly going bust” saga) and many of those fans who have long passed, fans will still feel for just like a family member as many were close mates. Lumber lists many that have passed at the back of the book.

The book by Lumber is a good read and tells some good stories and some bad ones also. But fair play to Paul for getting it printed. There are many young’uns on OTIB who won’t have a scooby doo what happened in the 80s/90s and this book gives a good insight/recollection of some of them.

The Rovers Eastville story and “changing the locks” ...........

I've been to many Swindon v City games since the mid 70's and it's the one game I miss the most as there's always a great atmosphere home or away

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5 hours ago, phantom said:

 

The first line is a phrase I have heard mention in bars around this country still today

The locks story, whilst many I appreciate wont like what happened, it is simply genius and if happened in a film people would say that would never happen

 

To me the book is what it is, of course we know there are those have their feelings against all that went on, but it did happen and whilst the book has its flaws some of the stories were interesting to read, and more so when names etc are people that I recognise.

I think it is unfair to pick out the actual writing at least he gave it a go. I have read many similar books over the years and was glad there was a City version written.

Yes. I agree with all this. The point about writing I made was someone said it was ghost written, if that was the case not great.
 

However as I pointed out to my lawyer (who read it, don't worry he’s not in England) who made the comment about writing to me, ‘it’s a book about footy violence and a window into my life from a very very young age’ the style Of writing reflects the subject!

Edited by REDOXO
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I personally enjoyed the book, a bit after my time for that kind of stuff but recognize a few people in there, have just bought the book for a second time on Kindle so can read on my work travels, it's not supposed to be high literature, just a normal blokes recollections of his youth/ early manhood, when I tell similar stories to my friends now they are aghast, but to many of us living in those times, poverty and physicality was just normality,  take the book to be entertainment, probably bits of embellishment but on the whole a reverie from today's reality.

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On 01/05/2020 at 23:48, freezer said:

I agree.

He certainly has the capacity to integrate the humour side of things. 

Sharp as a rubber ball he is?!

There is an old Thomas Cook travel brochure from the 70's and Beany is on the front cover sat by a pool somewhere in Spain ?

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2 hours ago, Med/MadHatter said:

I personally enjoyed the book, a bit after my time for that kind of stuff but recognize a few people in there, have just bought the book for a second time on Kindle so can read on my work travels, it's not supposed to be high literature, just a normal blokes recollections of his youth/ early manhood, when I tell similar stories to my friends now they are aghast, but to many of us living in those times, poverty and physicality was just normality,  take the book to be entertainment, probably bits of embellishment but on the whole a reverie from today's reality.

Thats is one of the reasons i went away as a kid easy to nick from shops in a mob loads of us used to do it only way to stay up with the fashion. 

Thanks god my kids aint turned out like it 

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9 hours ago, sticks 1969 said:

The. Worst books I’ve ever read are by the brimson brothers who say they fallow Watford. They bang on about england away quite a lot and yet iv never seen either of them in the years iv been going . A right pair of tools these two seem to be and if memory severs me one was even on breakfast tv one morning.... now I don’t think any of the people mentioned in this book would be that keen on sitting on the coach with graham on points west at 6.30 in the evening.....would you ?

They are very successful guys - eg Dougie Brimson served in the RAF for 18 years and has since won many awards for his film writing and Eddy is a successful actor and a stand up comedian. Dougie is also significantly older than you (assuming your date of birth is 1969) so may have followed England away before you did? You’ve also been privileged to have followed England in the ‘sanitised’ football experience era ... all that aside though, you say you haven’t seen them following England....so that means they didn’t? You identify, know, remember and log everyone who has followed England since you started doing so?

Edited by BS4 on Tour...
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