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TomF

England summer cricket internationals

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17 hours ago, hodge said:

Can we rename this thread England Cricket Summer Internationals or something?

We sure can @hodge

Makes sense to keep the thread going

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5 minutes ago, phantom said:

We sure can @hodge

Makes sense to keep the thread going

Maybe change it again to ‘The Ashes’  when they begin in August? 

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Just saw the score for the women's ashes. The headline is "Remorseless Australia press on against England". They're 278-3 off 107 overs! Even as a bit of cricketing purest I'd struggle to watch that!

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10 hours ago, Coppello said:

Just saw the score for the women's ashes. The headline is "Remorseless Australia press on against England". They're 278-3 off 107 overs! Even as a bit of cricketing purest I'd struggle to watch that!

Yorkshire were on about that last week first innings v Somerset! 

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Interesting little article by Oliver Holt speaking to Jos Buttler about the WC final

Thought you boys may enjoy if you haven’t seen it

 

___________________________________________________

Jos Buttler is thinking about what might have been. What might have been if England had lost the most dramatic game in cricket history last Sunday. 

What might have been if England had lost to India at Edgbaston in the group stage and not even qualified for the semi-finals. 

What people would have said. What he would have done. Where he would have found a rock to crawl under.

He can smile about it now, but the idea haunts him. When England stuttered midway through the tournament, and then again in the days before the final, he sought out England's team psychologist, David Young. 

Buttler had convinced himself it was England's destiny to win their home World Cup at Lord's. 

Yet fear of failure, every elite sportsman's faithful companion, lingered at his side.

'Before the India game,' he says, 'I was struggling with coming to terms with the prospect of us getting knocked out. We'd been favourites, so highly fancied by everyone, and there was the danger that four years of playing such good cricket was going to come to nothing.

Think about what people will say about us as a team, think about how they will call us chokers, everything else they will say. I remember seeing a comment — maybe it was the one that got Jonny Bairstow wound up — about how it would be the biggest failure because of how much had gone into this World Cup. I was struggling with the thought of that.

'I had played in eight finals before Sunday and lost seven of them. I'd played in lots with Somerset, the Champions Trophy with England and when we lost the T20 in Kolkata and I knew how much it hurt watching the other team lift the trophy. I didn't want to feel that pain and that regret again.

'What was scaring me was if we lost, I didn't know how I'd play cricket again. This was such a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, a World Cup final at Lord's. It felt like destiny and I was thinking: "If it doesn't happen, I will have no motivation to pick up a cricket bat for a very long time". When I was talking to David, I knew the answers.

'I knew all I could look after was the stuff I could look after, and I needed to get into my zone, which allows me to perform the best I can. But what happens if it goes wrong?'

 

Buttler found the answer to that in the end. He made sure it didn't go wrong. He took control.

He is sitting in a quiet room at the Kookaburra bat factory in Corby, thinking about it. He is a quietly spoken man, whose modesty and poise sometimes seem at odds with the extravagance of his shot-making, but one of the reasons he can be so honest about his fears is because he has inner strength, too. He has steel at his core.

He confronted his worries about failure and dealt with them. And in the end, it was Buttler who performed the game's last action when he ran out Martin Guptill.

In the most stressful, nail-biting, nerve-jangling, chest-tightening game of cricket most of us have ever witnessed, Buttler and Ben Stokes were the main men. When it looked like the World Cup was slipping away at Lord's, and someone needed to take responsibility, it was Buttler who stepped forward.

 

It was Buttler who put on 110 with Stokes for the fifth wicket, Buttler who showed breathtaking audacity to play a couple of his signature ramp shots when the stakes were at their highest and New Zealand were tightening the screw. It was Buttler who came out with Stokes for the super over and smashed a boundary off the last ball.

And when everything was in the balance and New Zealand needed two off the last ball of their super over to win the trophy, it was Buttler who gathered Jason Roy's throw and broke the stumps before Guptill could make his ground.

In the 1999 tournament, South Africa's Herschelle Gibbs was called 'the man who dropped the World Cup' after putting down a catch against Australia.

On Sunday, in the greatest moment in England's cricket history, Buttler was the man who caught it.

 

'If you're watching the game from the outside,' Buttler says, 'you must think all the players must be so nervous as Jofra Archer is coming in to bowl that last ball. But as a cricketer, it's where you want to be. You're in the middle, you've got some control. You've done it time and again. Just because it's a final, it's still the same thing, collecting the ball and taking the stumps.

'You're on autopilot really. I felt very in-the-moment. Guptill pushed it off his legs and once I saw it going straight to Jason, I thought: "If we get this right, we can win this". I knew Guptill would be a long way out. Under pressure, nothing is simple but I knew it should be simple.

'When Jason picked it up, there was no thought he might misfield it. None of those thoughts happen. He picks it up, throws it to me and I take the stumps. I had to come down the pitch a little bit but I knew that as long as I collected the ball cleanly, I would have time to get to the stumps because he was a long way out.

 

'Lord's is like a billiards table, so you know the bounce is going to be true. You know where the ball will end up. If I knew Guptill was going to be closer, I may have been more anxious or rushed it, but I knew I had some time to play with, so it was just as simple as making sure I got it in my hands.

'When you look back on it, you realise the enormity of the moment. Talk about not being able to live with yourself. If I'd fumbled that moment . . . we are that far from winning the World Cup and I've messed it up. But the reality is that as soon as I saw we were going to get the chance to run someone out, I knew Jason would do his job and I would do my job.

'I knew in the moment I broke the wicket, that was it. Both gloves went, I threw my hat in the air. I was running around and Moeen Ali was aeroplaning past me and Jofra was on the floor miles away. Those feelings justify everything. That moment lasts for 20 seconds, maybe, and it is just the best time of your cricket career.

'I didn't cry after the game. I thought I would, but it wasn't until the next day. I watched the highlights and I was overwhelmed with what we had achieved. It justifies everything you have worked for, all the sacrifice, the sacrifice of family and friends, every gym session, every net session you didn't want to do. It justifies everything.'

 

Buttler came to the crease in the final with England reeling on 86 for four, having lost the wickets of Joe Root and Eoin Morgan cheaply.

He and Stokes knew that the first requirement was simply to build some sort of partnership to steady the innings. They are both swashbuckling players but they knew this was not the time for all-out attack.

'The run rate wasn't going to be the issue,' says Buttler. 'Ben had been in really good form throughout the tournament. It felt like he just needed a partner. I felt great in the middle and I felt I had a partner in him. I felt we could do it together and we were slowly ticking it off. I had loads of belief.

'We talked about how we wanted to get to a point where we needed 80 off the last 10 [overs]. And we actually got to the point where we needed 72 off the last 10. We were getting to where we wanted to be and I started questioning when I should start trying to be a bit more aggressive. It was getting up to eight or nine an over. I knew I had to look for the boundaries.

'I started to think I have to trust my team-mates here. I want it to be all on me but we are four wickets down. We have got Woakes, Plunkett, Rashid and Archer. These guys can bat. It's been one of the strengths of the side for a long time. You think it's all on me and Stokes but you think: "I can afford to take a risk now because I trust the guys behind me".'

Buttler was out to the penultimate ball of the 45th over, skying a catch to substitute fielder Tim Southee at cover, with England 45 runs short of the Kiwis' total. Fear gripped him again. He sat in the dressing room, watching, powerless.

'Every dot ball, I would kick something,' he says. 'And then I thought: "This isn't really helpful for the guys who are waiting to bat". You go through all the emotions: "Oh my God, we are going to lose and I am going to have the rest of my life thinking about that". Then Stokesy would hit a four or a six and you are thinking: "We could actually do this and how good would that be".

'I was berating myself for getting out. I wanted to be there at the end. I'd had a few quiet games with the bat and I felt that this was my time and that maybe it was meant to be and it was my opportunity.

'Then you get out and all your romantic thoughts fly away and you feel you have messed it up. And then suddenly, there is a super over and you have another chance.'

Buttler seized it. He stepped up first with the bat and then with the final ball run out. And when it was over, and England were world champions and all that fear of failure had flown away into the sky over St John's Wood, he realised that something had changed.

'It is so English to fall in a certain way,' he says. 'At the last hurdle. I don't mean we enjoy the failure but it's almost like "It's OK, we did so well, we are never meant to be the team that wins". And so after the match, I did feel sorry for the New Zealanders but at the same time I was so happy that wasn't us.

'It was written in the stars. It was destiny for us as a team. I talked to Moeen about this: he said we were meant to struggle. It wasn't meant to be easy before the India game. We talked about how enjoyable it would be when you have to struggle for it and fight for it. 

'We had played in lots of series where we have blasted big scores and dominated in that way, and that is enjoyable, but to come through adversity and hardship feels even more special. That gives you so much faith that good things can happen.'

Before he goes, Buttler mentions another side of the conversation he had with David Young.

'I was talking to him about how if we win, I wouldn't care what happens in the rest of my career,' Buttler says. 'That victory would be there forever and I feel it would justify everything I have ever wanted for the team and for myself.

'I'm 28 and for however long I have left in my career, I would just enjoy it and think: "That happened". 

'But you always know there is something else. It's there. It's written in history next to 1966 and 2003 but it isn't the be-all and end-all. It's a big relief and I feel huge excitement for the rest of my career but even now, I see it as a platform to go on to even better things.'

 

 

 

 

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20 minutes ago, BobBobSuperBob said:

Interesting little article by Oliver Holt speaking to Jos Buttler about the WC final

Thought you boys may enjoy if you haven’t seen it

 

___________________________________________________

Jos Buttler is thinking about what might have been. What might have been if England had lost the most dramatic game in cricket history last Sunday. 

What might have been if England had lost to India at Edgbaston in the group stage and not even qualified for the semi-finals. 

What people would have said. What he would have done. Where he would have found a rock to crawl under.

He can smile about it now, but the idea haunts him. When England stuttered midway through the tournament, and then again in the days before the final, he sought out England's team psychologist, David Young. 

Buttler had convinced himself it was England's destiny to win their home World Cup at Lord's. 

Yet fear of failure, every elite sportsman's faithful companion, lingered at his side.

'Before the India game,' he says, 'I was struggling with coming to terms with the prospect of us getting knocked out. We'd been favourites, so highly fancied by everyone, and there was the danger that four years of playing such good cricket was going to come to nothing.

Think about what people will say about us as a team, think about how they will call us chokers, everything else they will say. I remember seeing a comment — maybe it was the one that got Jonny Bairstow wound up — about how it would be the biggest failure because of how much had gone into this World Cup. I was struggling with the thought of that.

'I had played in eight finals before Sunday and lost seven of them. I'd played in lots with Somerset, the Champions Trophy with England and when we lost the T20 in Kolkata and I knew how much it hurt watching the other team lift the trophy. I didn't want to feel that pain and that regret again.

'What was scaring me was if we lost, I didn't know how I'd play cricket again. This was such a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, a World Cup final at Lord's. It felt like destiny and I was thinking: "If it doesn't happen, I will have no motivation to pick up a cricket bat for a very long time". When I was talking to David, I knew the answers.

'I knew all I could look after was the stuff I could look after, and I needed to get into my zone, which allows me to perform the best I can. But what happens if it goes wrong?'

 

Buttler found the answer to that in the end. He made sure it didn't go wrong. He took control.

He is sitting in a quiet room at the Kookaburra bat factory in Corby, thinking about it. He is a quietly spoken man, whose modesty and poise sometimes seem at odds with the extravagance of his shot-making, but one of the reasons he can be so honest about his fears is because he has inner strength, too. He has steel at his core.

He confronted his worries about failure and dealt with them. And in the end, it was Buttler who performed the game's last action when he ran out Martin Guptill.

In the most stressful, nail-biting, nerve-jangling, chest-tightening game of cricket most of us have ever witnessed, Buttler and Ben Stokes were the main men. When it looked like the World Cup was slipping away at Lord's, and someone needed to take responsibility, it was Buttler who stepped forward.

 

It was Buttler who put on 110 with Stokes for the fifth wicket, Buttler who showed breathtaking audacity to play a couple of his signature ramp shots when the stakes were at their highest and New Zealand were tightening the screw. It was Buttler who came out with Stokes for the super over and smashed a boundary off the last ball.

And when everything was in the balance and New Zealand needed two off the last ball of their super over to win the trophy, it was Buttler who gathered Jason Roy's throw and broke the stumps before Guptill could make his ground.

In the 1999 tournament, South Africa's Herschelle Gibbs was called 'the man who dropped the World Cup' after putting down a catch against Australia.

On Sunday, in the greatest moment in England's cricket history, Buttler was the man who caught it.

 

'If you're watching the game from the outside,' Buttler says, 'you must think all the players must be so nervous as Jofra Archer is coming in to bowl that last ball. But as a cricketer, it's where you want to be. You're in the middle, you've got some control. You've done it time and again. Just because it's a final, it's still the same thing, collecting the ball and taking the stumps.

'You're on autopilot really. I felt very in-the-moment. Guptill pushed it off his legs and once I saw it going straight to Jason, I thought: "If we get this right, we can win this". I knew Guptill would be a long way out. Under pressure, nothing is simple but I knew it should be simple.

'When Jason picked it up, there was no thought he might misfield it. None of those thoughts happen. He picks it up, throws it to me and I take the stumps. I had to come down the pitch a little bit but I knew that as long as I collected the ball cleanly, I would have time to get to the stumps because he was a long way out.

 

'Lord's is like a billiards table, so you know the bounce is going to be true. You know where the ball will end up. If I knew Guptill was going to be closer, I may have been more anxious or rushed it, but I knew I had some time to play with, so it was just as simple as making sure I got it in my hands.

'When you look back on it, you realise the enormity of the moment. Talk about not being able to live with yourself. If I'd fumbled that moment . . . we are that far from winning the World Cup and I've messed it up. But the reality is that as soon as I saw we were going to get the chance to run someone out, I knew Jason would do his job and I would do my job.

'I knew in the moment I broke the wicket, that was it. Both gloves went, I threw my hat in the air. I was running around and Moeen Ali was aeroplaning past me and Jofra was on the floor miles away. Those feelings justify everything. That moment lasts for 20 seconds, maybe, and it is just the best time of your cricket career.

'I didn't cry after the game. I thought I would, but it wasn't until the next day. I watched the highlights and I was overwhelmed with what we had achieved. It justifies everything you have worked for, all the sacrifice, the sacrifice of family and friends, every gym session, every net session you didn't want to do. It justifies everything.'

 

Buttler came to the crease in the final with England reeling on 86 for four, having lost the wickets of Joe Root and Eoin Morgan cheaply.

He and Stokes knew that the first requirement was simply to build some sort of partnership to steady the innings. They are both swashbuckling players but they knew this was not the time for all-out attack.

'The run rate wasn't going to be the issue,' says Buttler. 'Ben had been in really good form throughout the tournament. It felt like he just needed a partner. I felt great in the middle and I felt I had a partner in him. I felt we could do it together and we were slowly ticking it off. I had loads of belief.

'We talked about how we wanted to get to a point where we needed 80 off the last 10 [overs]. And we actually got to the point where we needed 72 off the last 10. We were getting to where we wanted to be and I started questioning when I should start trying to be a bit more aggressive. It was getting up to eight or nine an over. I knew I had to look for the boundaries.

'I started to think I have to trust my team-mates here. I want it to be all on me but we are four wickets down. We have got Woakes, Plunkett, Rashid and Archer. These guys can bat. It's been one of the strengths of the side for a long time. You think it's all on me and Stokes but you think: "I can afford to take a risk now because I trust the guys behind me".'

Buttler was out to the penultimate ball of the 45th over, skying a catch to substitute fielder Tim Southee at cover, with England 45 runs short of the Kiwis' total. Fear gripped him again. He sat in the dressing room, watching, powerless.

'Every dot ball, I would kick something,' he says. 'And then I thought: "This isn't really helpful for the guys who are waiting to bat". You go through all the emotions: "Oh my God, we are going to lose and I am going to have the rest of my life thinking about that". Then Stokesy would hit a four or a six and you are thinking: "We could actually do this and how good would that be".

'I was berating myself for getting out. I wanted to be there at the end. I'd had a few quiet games with the bat and I felt that this was my time and that maybe it was meant to be and it was my opportunity.

'Then you get out and all your romantic thoughts fly away and you feel you have messed it up. And then suddenly, there is a super over and you have another chance.'

Buttler seized it. He stepped up first with the bat and then with the final ball run out. And when it was over, and England were world champions and all that fear of failure had flown away into the sky over St John's Wood, he realised that something had changed.

'It is so English to fall in a certain way,' he says. 'At the last hurdle. I don't mean we enjoy the failure but it's almost like "It's OK, we did so well, we are never meant to be the team that wins". And so after the match, I did feel sorry for the New Zealanders but at the same time I was so happy that wasn't us.

'It was written in the stars. It was destiny for us as a team. I talked to Moeen about this: he said we were meant to struggle. It wasn't meant to be easy before the India game. We talked about how enjoyable it would be when you have to struggle for it and fight for it. 

'We had played in lots of series where we have blasted big scores and dominated in that way, and that is enjoyable, but to come through adversity and hardship feels even more special. That gives you so much faith that good things can happen.'

Before he goes, Buttler mentions another side of the conversation he had with David Young.

'I was talking to him about how if we win, I wouldn't care what happens in the rest of my career,' Buttler says. 'That victory would be there forever and I feel it would justify everything I have ever wanted for the team and for myself.

'I'm 28 and for however long I have left in my career, I would just enjoy it and think: "That happened". 

'But you always know there is something else. It's there. It's written in history next to 1966 and 2003 but it isn't the be-all and end-all. It's a big relief and I feel huge excitement for the rest of my career but even now, I see it as a platform to go on to even better things.'

 

 

 

 

Great article. Pretty sure Joss will be the next captain of England.

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On 19/07/2019 at 11:32, Coppello said:

Just saw the score for the women's ashes. The headline is "Remorseless Australia press on against England". They're 278-3 off 107 overs! Even as a bit of cricketing purest I'd struggle to watch that!

I do enjoy the women’s game but playing two test matches when lots of the players have played half a dozen in their whole careers is ridiculous. The focus seems to be T20 and ODI’s which are very watchable but test matches seems to feel strangely out of place.

Australia look streets ahead currently.

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What’s the thoughts on the Ashes side? I would go for either this or Northeast instead of Sibley with Bairstow opening and Northeast at 3.

Attacking line up but there are no batsmen that we can sure is better than Curran and that bowling line up has a great chance of 20 wickets

8D63D86A-162C-4776-8203-7AEE141EB73F.jpeg

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1 hour ago, RedDave said:

What’s the thoughts on the Ashes side? I would go for either this or Northeast instead of Sibley with Bairstow opening and Northeast at 3.

Attacking line up but there are no batsmen that we can sure is better than Curran and that bowling line up has a great chance of 20 wickets

8D63D86A-162C-4776-8203-7AEE141EB73F.jpeg

Think I would have Mark Wood instead of Woakes depending on the pitch and for some variation, would make it a long tail though! I would choose Cook over Sibley and Northeast, but that’s not possible, so whoever is in the best form. I worry about the batting lineup.

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Its a big ask to chuck someone new to international cricket in against the Aussies, from memory the 2 successful ones in recent times are KP and Trott, both turned out the be highly successful. Burns has the slot atm and if he gets even half decent scores against Ireland he'll be playing against the Aussies.

This would be my choice at the moment

  1. Burns
  2. Roy
  3. Bairstow
  4. Root
  5. Stokes
  6. Buttler
  7. Curran (Adds a different dimension being left handed, capable #7)
  8. Archer
  9. Broad
  10. Anderson
  11. Leach

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Just now, phantom said:

Wood is injured though isn't he?

I do wonder whether Archer can bowl enough quality overs

His action looks like it'll let him, my concern is how he bowls in the longer format, despite being quick players can wait him out, will his short ball be as effective in tests?

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21 minutes ago, TomF said:

Anderson must be a doubt, not fit enough for Ireland test - safer to go with Woakes at this rate

Helps Gregory's chances of playing v Ireland

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Joe Root (c), Moeen Ali, Rory Burns, Sam Curran, Jonny Bairstow, Stuart Broad, Joe Denly, Jack Leach, Jason Roy, Olly Stone, Chris Woakes

Can Lewis now be released to play for Somerset?

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42 minutes ago, hodge said:

Joe Root (c), Moeen Ali, Rory Burns, Sam Curran, Jonny Bairstow, Stuart Broad, Joe Denly, Jack Leach, Jason Roy, Olly Stone, Chris Woakes

Can Lewis now be released to play for Somerset?

Who is 12th man?

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9 minutes ago, phantom said:

Who is 12th man?

You'd presume it'll be Lewis, but would be nice for us if he's released to play for us and England do their thing of calling upon local players to be sub fielders.

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I had a look for tickets for the Ashes, going for over £200 per day!! So that isn't happening but what is happening is I'm going to take in New Zealand v England test match in New Zealand from November 21st!!

Tickets for a one-dayer in New Zealand v India were £20, so I'm hopeful of not paying over a grand to watch a full test match.

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48 minutes ago, hodge said:

You'd presume it'll be Lewis, but would be nice for us if he's released to play for us and England do their thing of calling upon local players to be sub fielders.

Do the new rules re. sub players for in-match injuries and the like where you can bring in an `equivalent` player  apply in The Ashes series though? If they do, England will surely want to keep a couple of decent subs around and Lewis being able to bowl and bat would probably be one of them.

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Can we get the Hampshire ground staff up to Edgbaston to prepare the wicket for the first test given the way the Aussie practice game is going

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4 hours ago, Tipps69 said:

I had a look for tickets for the Ashes, going for over £200 per day!! So that isn't happening but what is happening is I'm going to take in New Zealand v England test match in New Zealand from November 21st!!

Tickets for a one-dayer in New Zealand v India were £20, so I'm hopeful of not paying over a grand to watch a full test match.

It’s mental money- 5 of us had tickets for all 5 days in St Lucia and didn’t cost much more than the cost of 1day in this country. 

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22 minutes ago, Spoonbed said:

It’s mental money- 5 of us had tickets for all 5 days in St Lucia and didn’t cost much more than the cost of 1day in this country. 

I honestly didn't realise it was that ridiculous, I'd assumed all tickets would of sold ages ago & only stumbled upon them while searching for other tickets.

I could basically pay for my return flights to New Zealand & get tickets for all 5 days of the test for the price of going to 1 day of an Ashes test here!

I've had my worry of the vast majority of kids never playing cricket because of the tv situation & thought the World Cup Final being aired on Channel 4 was a massive positive but how can this encourage kids to watch & then take part in the sport when they are so heavily priced out of seeing the stars of the game? We could start losing generations because they simply aren't even aware of what cricket is! I was lucky, I am of an age where all home test matches were shown on the BBC & spent most of my summer holidays down my local park playing cricket with my mates but nowadays the parks are empty, no kids playing cricket or football & it's a sad state of affairs.

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19 hours ago, Tipps69 said:

I had a look for tickets for the Ashes, going for over £200 per day!! So that isn't happening but what is happening is I'm going to take in New Zealand v England test match in New Zealand from November 21st!!

Tickets for a one-dayer in New Zealand v India were £20, so I'm hopeful of not paying over a grand to watch a full test match.

Really?

I just booked 2 tickets for day 2 of old Trafford test, £67 each

was a few other tickets left and seemed to be tickets on other days, just went through Lancashire website

 

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Club and Country said:

Really?

I just booked 2 tickets for day 2 of old Trafford test, £67 each

was a few other tickets left and seemed to be tickets on other days, just went through Lancashire website

 

 

 

As I said, I was looking for tickets to another event & these popped up at over £200 each for one day. I just thought it was astronomical (which it is).

I guess it’s a problem caused by all these different ticket sites & venues not making the effort to make sure that tickets end up going in the right hands. It’s long been a problem.

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12 minutes ago, Tipps69 said:

As I said, I was looking for tickets to another event & these popped up at over £200 each for one day. I just thought it was astronomical (which it is).

I guess it’s a problem caused by all these different ticket sites & venues not making the effort to make sure that tickets end up going in the right hands. It’s long been a problem.

I think that it is more to do with the fact they sold out ages ago

I was offered tickets to any of the days at The Oval for £35 a few weeks back

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Like Roy and would definitely have picked him , but you can see why he hasn’t been Test Match pick before - have tbh I can’t see the Aussies not seeing him as an easy scalp with a new red ball

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Well.....this is going well

Thats the top three places cemented !

 

It is nibbling around , but the Aussies must be quaking in their boots

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Worth remembering too Ireland seem quite suited, on the bowling front at least to these conditions. Probably similar over there plus quite a lot have played County cricket here!

Edited by Mr Popodopolous

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Just now, Mr Popodopolous said:

Ireland seem quite suited, on the bowling front at least to these conditions. Probably similar over there plus quite a lot have played County cricket here!

Well how many years has Murtagh bowled at Lords?

Quite funny how Bairstow doesn't seem to understand the rule about where he can stand 

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Just now, hodge said:

Well how many years has Murtagh bowled at Lords?

Quite funny how Bairstow doesn't seem to understand the rule about where he can stand 

Ha yes, had forgotten about that.

Thought they had the core of a reasonable Test team a few years ago. Porterfield-Stirling-Joyce-O'Brien-Morgan-O'Brien-Murtagh-Rankin-Dockrell. Came too late for some and then there were some others who we acquired.

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  Just waiting for a 5 run penalty against Bairstow

Just now, hodge said:

  Just waiting for a 5 run penalty against Bairstow

Well not anymore I'm not 🙄

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Dear oh dear

What sort of shot was that

 

Add a World Cup come down to our batting frailties and if we aren’t careful we could get a hammering from Aussies

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Just now, BobBobSuperBob said:

Dear oh dear

What sort of shot was that

 

Add a World Cup come down to our batting frailties and if we aren’t careful we could get a hammering from Aussies

To be fair the Aussies lost 17 wickets in a day in their in squad practice game

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We might have come a long way in one day cricket but thanks to one day an T20 there is hardly a top order batsmen left not being produced that has the technique against a moving ball 

This is embarrassing

42 for 6

Really ?

Not sure where we go batting line up now tbh

Edited by BobBobSuperBob

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