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Bristol Rob

Local Derby Documentary

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I have some! 😂

give me a message and I can help you with footage/ memories/ experiences from a policing point of view if that is what you want . 

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32 minutes ago, JulieH said:

I have some! 😂

give me a message and I can help you with footage/ memories/ experiences from a policing point of view if that is what you want . 

I'm looking forward to your memoirs WPC J 👮‍♀️

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5 minutes ago, Drew Peacock said:

Who is Lorna Davey?

Media student at Weston College

I did message her to say about posting on here. . .

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It would only be balanced from our point of view. Can you imagine any of that lot being interviewed 😂 

we are the biggest and bestest team in Bristol unlucky da shit . Premiership in 5 yers 5 yers 🤪

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12 hours ago, phantom said:

Media student at Weston College

I did message her to say about posting on here. . .

Would have thought it was  a history degree given the subject matter.

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2 hours ago, MattWSM said:

donawa 90th min winner everyone standing in aisles and side of pitch on touchline for all 2nd half

There wasn’t anyone stood along the side of the pitch. Other than the linesman..! 
Was a magical night though!

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I met an old boy in the Bear and Swan in Chew Magna about 20 years ago. He said that his family- and everyone they knew - would simply support whoever was playing at home back n the day.  Basically they supported both teams. This was totally acceptable until the 1970s when, for some reason the supporters separated themselves out and decided to hate each other. 
Bizarre. 

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38 minutes ago, bcfcredandwhite said:

I met an old boy in the Bear and Swan in Chew Magna about 20 years ago. He said that his family- and everyone they knew - would simply support whoever was playing at home back n the day.  Basically they supported both teams. This was totally acceptable until the 1970s when, for some reason the supporters separated themselves out and decided to hate each other. 
Bizarre. 

Yep my old man was the same, luckily I was basically raised by my Gran and Gramps, as I never had a Mum and Dad was working, and Gramps was City through and through 

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6 hours ago, Bar BS3 said:

There wasn’t anyone stood along the side of the pitch. Other than the linesman..! 
Was a magical night though!

oh yes there was I was there....  in front of the dolman

 

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41 minutes ago, MattWSM said:

oh yes there was I was there....  in front of the dolman

 

I honestly can’t remember that. Maybe you’re right and my mind is failing..! 
Are you sure you’re not thinking of the small terrace area at the bottom of the Dolman steps, which wasn’t usually open..? 

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6 hours ago, bcfcredandwhite said:

I met an old boy in the Bear and Swan in Chew Magna about 20 years ago. He said that his family- and everyone they knew - would simply support whoever was playing at home back n the day.  Basically they supported both teams. This was totally acceptable until the 1970s when, for some reason the supporters separated themselves out and decided to hate each other. 
Bizarre. 

Nothing bizarre with hating them bunch of tossers.... 

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25 minutes ago, Bar BS3 said:

I honestly can’t remember that. Maybe you’re right and my mind is failing..! 
Are you sure you’re not thinking of the small terrace area at the bottom of the Dolman steps, which wasn’t usually open..? 

I might be...but pretty sure I'm not, seems vivid. we will have to find some footage 

Edited by MattWSM
typo

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24 minutes ago, MattWSM said:

I might be...but pretty sure I'm not, seems vivid. we will have to find some footage 

See Phantoms post with the footage. 
As I thought, although I’d forgotten how that area used to fill up towards the end. Was packed by the time we scored, after being empty in the first half. 
I’d also forgotten we hit the woodwork a couple of times, before Holloway & Leaning did their thing..! 

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3 minutes ago, Bar BS3 said:

See Phantoms post with the footage. 
As I thought, although I’d forgotten how that area used to fill up towards the end. Was packed by the time we scored, after being empty in the first half. 
I’d also forgotten we hit the woodwork a couple of times, before Holloway & Leaning did their thing..! 

I hope this has copied correctly. I'm currently sat on a train so the link is blocked my end

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5 hours ago, Bar BS3 said:

I honestly can’t remember that. Maybe you’re right and my mind is failing..! 
Are you sure you’re not thinking of the small terrace area at the bottom of the Dolman steps, which wasn’t usually open..? 

It was open, and packed!

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4 hours ago, Bar BS3 said:

See Phantoms post with the footage. 
As I thought, although I’d forgotten how that area used to fill up towards the end. Was packed by the time we scored, after being empty in the first half. 
I’d also forgotten we hit the woodwork a couple of times, before Holloway & Leaning did their thing..! 

What was the derby match where the gates between the Dolman and the open end gave way due to the weight of the queue outside (I think it was the one after this, I spent the entire game in that bottom section of the Dolman, people were stood on the steps as well loads got in for free)

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4 hours ago, Ronnie Sinclair said:

What was the derby match where the gates between the Dolman and the open end gave way due to the weight of the queue outside (I think it was the one after this, I spent the entire game in that bottom section of the Dolman, people were stood on the steps as well loads got in for free)

One of my favourite ever city games that, it was a crazy night inside and outside the stadium! Your ears would be ringing and the heart pumping for hours afterwards 

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The 15/12/96 game  was I’m sure the game when Hollowhead almost got lynched.

75 of us from Briz met up at the Good Intent at 8am for breakfast🍺🍻🍷and got on a hired double decker bus down to ground.Quite a few came out from the Rising Sun to check we weren’t the funny ones but as the bus was rocking from side to side with us all singing city songs all was fine.

No comment after that me honour.

I really dislike playing them but the atmosphere is something different.It brings out the worst in me that’s for sure.

coyr and ftg

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12 hours ago, phantom said:

I hope this has copied correctly. I'm currently sat on a train so the link is blocked my end

thanks. what a night.

maybe what I am remembering was the last 5 minutes as vivid trying to stay off the pitch. any way doesnt matter, great days

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On 10/03/2020 at 20:53, steviestevieneville said:

It would only be balanced from our point of view. Can you imagine any of that lot being interviewed 😂 

They would no doubt come out with their often repeated lie about the 'KFC battle' when they frightened a few children from behind a line of police.

Not too many of them seem to remember the shame of getting a police escort to a home match. 

 

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On 11/03/2020 at 02:00, bcfcredandwhite said:

I met an old boy in the Bear and Swan in Chew Magna about 20 years ago. He said that his family- and everyone they knew - would simply support whoever was playing at home back n the day.  Basically they supported both teams. This was totally acceptable until the 1970s when, for some reason the supporters separated themselves out and decided to hate each other. 
Bizarre. 

Life was extremely ‘ tribal ‘ in the seventies , Mods fighting rockers , Punks fighting teds , Nazis fighting Anti Racists  , Police fighting Miners ...

Throw in jealousy over our success and there is your division.

My City supporting grandad, bless his soul, was an open and reasonable man who wouldn’t have never been seen dead supporting the Gas . 
 

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On 11/03/2020 at 07:37, archie andrews said:

Nothing bizarre with hating them bunch of tossers.... 

My ‘bizarre’ comment was aimed at why it suddenly happened in the 1970s. 


Portsmouth v Southampton is because of the dock strikes in the 1920s

Rangers v Celtic is part religion and part Irish politics 

Arsenal v Tottenham has become about religion but originated when the rich Woolwich Arsenal were saved from relegation artificially in the early 1900s at poorer Tottenhams expense 

Liverpool v Man U is from the vile pisstaking slogans that the Liverpool fans hung from bridges following the Munich air disaster  

City v Rovers - well there isn’t anything really. Someone suddenly must have said ‘I know, let’s  hate them’ in the 1970s and that’s when it started - so it seems. 

 

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Life was different in the 70s. More tribal. Fight those from a different estate. North v Bristol. Somerset (City) v Gloucs 9Rovers). Citys support was different to the Gas they were bikers and greebos an then skins. City were smarter. They try to hide this but the Gas had NF following them and City had lads from St Pauls - SPAM St Pauls Aggro Merchants. This carried on elsewhere at gigs with City v Gas at the Clashthen Damned and Ruts . When Crass played in Bristol there was a pitched battle in Old Market supposedly anti racist groups v the BNP at the heart it was City (black and white) v Gas skins.  

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Interesting you say City were ‘smarter’. 

From a North Bristol Reds perspective, certainly early 70’s and possibly beyond, it was The Gas who seemed the more organised in terms of getting their numbers together. Although having the greater numbers, we always seemed to be a bit fragmented. 

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Red Rock. Smarter = clothes mate. You could tell City v Rovers by their dress and it was not colours. Early 70's dunno. Late no and eighties no way. 

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2 hours ago, bcfcredandwhite said:

My ‘bizarre’ comment was aimed at why it suddenly happened in the 1970s. 


Portsmouth v Southampton is because of the dock strikes in the 1920s

Rangers v Celtic is part religion and part Irish politics 

Arsenal v Tottenham has become about religion but originated when the rich Woolwich Arsenal were saved from relegation artificially in the early 1900s at poorer Tottenhams expense 

Liverpool v Man U is from the vile pisstaking slogans that the Liverpool fans hung from bridges following the Munich air disaster  

City v Rovers - well there isn’t anything really. Someone suddenly must have said ‘I know, let’s  hate them’ in the 1970s and that’s when it started - so it seems. 

 

I will stick with green , all consuming envy at our ascension to the top level plus we rubbed their snotty little noses in it . 
 

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3 hours ago, bcfcredandwhite said:

My ‘bizarre’ comment was aimed at why it suddenly happened in the 1970s. 


Portsmouth v Southampton is because of the dock strikes in the 1920s

Rangers v Celtic is part religion and part Irish politics 

Arsenal v Tottenham has become about religion but originated when the rich Woolwich Arsenal were saved from relegation artificially in the early 1900s at poorer Tottenhams expense 

Liverpool v Man U is from the vile pisstaking slogans that the Liverpool fans hung from bridges following the Munich air disaster  

City v Rovers - well there isn’t anything really. Someone suddenly must have said ‘I know, let’s  hate them’ in the 1970s and that’s when it started - so it seems. 

 

Violence and crime spiked, against the long-term trend, in the 60s and 70s. Boffins suggest demographics to be largely responsible, along with cultural changes such as increasing technology - ie television - and the in informalization of society. Plus some other stuff.

Demographics show that there were more young males in the 1960s than there had been for half a century.

Young males - roughly 14 to 24 - are, basically, ******* morons. This is a fact, not an opinion. And, yes, I was a ******* moron at that age too. Young males need to be civilised by their elders, of whom there had almost always been many more of.

You've heard of the post war "baby boom"? Well, in the 1960s, and early 70s, the babies turned into adolescent morons, and so we had a "moron boom," with the ratio of young males - needing to be civilised into being grown ups - to their elders - those meant to do the civilising - being 1:2, rather than the usual 1:3.

The "elders" were swamped by the young morons, and couldn't cope. Father/son relationships suffered. Many of these fathers/elders had fought in the war and were knackered; they also thought their sons were *****  (which they were, they always are at that age), and gave up on them.

Technology, culture and consumer capitalism filled the void. Instead of looking to your dad, or your uncle, you looked to Keith ******* Moon, or Dave from Slade. Or films, like A Clockwork ******* Orange, or Taxi Driver. Culture showed these morons how to be a "man," ie, kick some other ****'s head in.

The divide between the moronic adolescents needing civilising and the exhausted/weary elders grew ever distant and wide.

Although the young morons thought Dave from Slade was great, they didn't realise that they wanted more from their fathers, to be closer to them, and they were ******* angry with their fathers.

When they got angry, they took it out on other young morons, who they were always hanging around with (instead of being with their fathers, learning what it took to be a grown up).

In Bristol, some other angry mob of young morons came in our end, and kicked our morons heads in. So, monkey see monkey do (egged on by television and sensationalist media coverage), we followed suit. And we were off: who can we have a go at? 

 

Young males need to be civilised and socialised in to adult society by those close to and older than them but this all fell apart in the 1960s and 70s due to a combination of demographics, post war adult exhaustion/dreariness, pop culture, consumer capitalism and Dave from Slade. The result was a kind of Lord of the Flies situation played out on the football terraces of England by morons dressed like Dave from Slade or Rod Stewart from The Faces (whereas previously they dressed like their fathers) to a soundtrack of glam rock. Something like that.

And you couldn't not dislike the morons on the Tote End, trust me. Scruffy *****. Hope this helps.

 

 

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On 10/03/2020 at 21:51, MattWSM said:

donawa 90th min winner everyone standing in aisles and side of pitch on touchline for all 2nd half

My favourite ever derby

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On 10/03/2020 at 07:47, JulieH said:

I have some! 😂

give me a message and I can help you with footage/ memories/ experiences from a policing point of view if that is what you want . 

Hi @JulieH

This is Lorna.

As you can imagine I have now had to develop my idea but am still looking for help. Could you possibly email me at city.rovers.memories@gmail.com so I can give you some more information and hopefully you could help me out please?

Thanks,

Lorna 

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On 12/03/2020 at 22:31, Galway Red said:

My favourite ever derby

For those under 25, a 'derby' is when Bristol City play some nondescript team called Bristol rovers. 😇

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49 minutes ago, Ska Junkie said:

For those under 25, a 'derby' is when Bristol City play some nondescript team called Bristol rovers. 😇

and certainly not a team with Wayne Rooney in it

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19 hours ago, LornaDocumentary said:

Hi @JulieH

This is Lorna.

As you can imagine I have now had to develop my idea but am still looking for help. Could you possibly email me at city.rovers.memories@gmail.com so I can give you some more information and hopefully you could help me out please?

Thanks,

Lorna 

Will do Lorna 👍

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On 12/03/2020 at 17:22, RedRock said:

Interesting you say City were ‘smarter’. 

From a North Bristol Reds perspective, certainly early 70’s and possibly beyond, it was The Gas who seemed the more organised in terms of getting their numbers together. Although having the greater numbers, we always seemed to be a bit fragmented. 

Think he ment dress sense 

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On 12/03/2020 at 20:54, Moments of Pleasure said:

Violence and crime spiked, against the long-term trend, in the 60s and 70s. Boffins suggest demographics to be largely responsible, along with cultural changes such as increasing technology - ie television - and the in informalization of society. Plus some other stuff.

Demographics show that there were more young males in the 1960s than there had been for half a century.

Young males - roughly 14 to 24 - are, basically, ******* morons. This is a fact, not an opinion. And, yes, I was a ******* moron at that age too. Young males need to be civilised by their elders, of whom there had almost always been many more of.

You've heard of the post war "baby boom"? Well, in the 1960s, and early 70s, the babies turned into adolescent morons, and so we had a "moron boom," with the ratio of young males - needing to be civilised into being grown ups - to their elders - those meant to do the civilising - being 1:2, rather than the usual 1:3.

The "elders" were swamped by the young morons, and couldn't cope. Father/son relationships suffered. Many of these fathers/elders had fought in the war and were knackered; they also thought their sons were *****  (which they were, they always are at that age), and gave up on them.

Technology, culture and consumer capitalism filled the void. Instead of looking to your dad, or your uncle, you looked to Keith ******* Moon, or Dave from Slade. Or films, like A Clockwork ******* Orange, or Taxi Driver. Culture showed these morons how to be a "man," ie, kick some other ****'s head in.

The divide between the moronic adolescents needing civilising and the exhausted/weary elders grew ever distant and wide.

Although the young morons thought Dave from Slade was great, they didn't realise that they wanted more from their fathers, to be closer to them, and they were ******* angry with their fathers.

When they got angry, they took it out on other young morons, who they were always hanging around with (instead of being with their fathers, learning what it took to be a grown up).

In Bristol, some other angry mob of young morons came in our end, and kicked our morons heads in. So, monkey see monkey do (egged on by television and sensationalist media coverage), we followed suit. And we were off: who can we have a go at? 

 

Young males need to be civilised and socialised in to adult society by those close to and older than them but this all fell apart in the 1960s and 70s due to a combination of demographics, post war adult exhaustion/dreariness, pop culture, consumer capitalism and Dave from Slade. The result was a kind of Lord of the Flies situation played out on the football terraces of England by morons dressed like Dave from Slade or Rod Stewart from The Faces (whereas previously they dressed like their fathers) to a soundtrack of glam rock. Something like that.

And you couldn't not dislike the morons on the Tote End, trust me. Scruffy *****. Hope this helps.

 

 

Enjoyable read but my main bone of contention was the continual referencing of Mr D Hill of Wolverhampton. I never thought of him as a potential leader for existing/up and coming morons.

Just to check my facts before replying, I did lots of research over a cuppa (Wikipedia=lots) only to find that your characterisation of him might stand up in court! His car registration was YOB 1.

 

 

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On 10/03/2020 at 07:14, Bristol Rob said:

Didn't see this posted elsewhere.

 In December, Sky T.V. broadcast the Bristol derby live. Minutes from the end, Rovers equalised an earlier Agostino goal and their fans ran onto the pitch to celebrate and jeer at the City fans. The home fans then invaded the pitch and mounted police were called on to disperse them. The Football League decided to punish City, but not Rovers.

 

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