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Goalkeeper Gloves


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I was watching the highlights of the 1979 FA Cup final on ITV today. Man United v Arsenal. Other than it being a good game, a few things stood out.

Man United had two ex City managers in their team

Liam Brady could go past people like they weren't there

The marching band was massive and there was two of them

Neither Gary Bailey or Pat Jennings were wearing gloves

The last one surprised me as I thought gloves were in by 1979. I can't really remember when gloves became the norm, were they banned from some competitions?

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They were in, but a lot of keepers relied on chewing gum and spit to create tacky hands in dry conditions.

Bonnetti had the table tennis bat gloves in mid 70s.  Jennings used gloves similar to gardeners gloves for wet weather.  He had huge hands though.

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Does gloves add an advantage too a goal keeper i suppose is the question.  If you are a natural goalie its almost in bred in you when playing in younger years especially around the shape of the ball in your hands, if its a wet ball, if its a deflected ball, if its a ball from a free kick out side of the box. A goalie is a goalie and not sure if wearing gloves makes a difference. A goalie now plays differently tactically in what he or she did twenty years ago. They are also a vital player in the strategic plan around defence strategies in how to play the ball by their feet and not just their capability in stopping the ball going behind them in the net.

I wear a gloves sometimes gardening but  that doesn’t mean I’m a better gardener. 

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I think it’s more to prevent injury isn’t it? All the modern ones have finger supports fitted in the back to reduce chances of bending back / breaking a finger when someone hits a piledriver at you 

 

also meant to help with grip in different conditions I think 

 

no idea if this was the justification for bringing them in years back though 

 

 

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City Oz wearing quality modern football gloves is an advantage for a goalkeeper. The human hand cannot create as a effective a grip with the ball as it will wearing goalkeeping gloves. As footballs have evolved balls have become harder to catch and hold. Players dry balls to take long throws for a genuine reason - its protective surface is difficult to grip when wet. The panelling (not weight) of balls make them swing more again making them harder to catch hence gloves and less catching.

There is a psychological aspect to this. Wearing quality gloves makes a player feel different. More prepared, Complete. Confident.

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2 hours ago, internetjef said:

I think it’s more to prevent injury isn’t it? All the modern ones have finger supports fitted in the back to reduce chances of bending back / breaking a finger when someone hits a piledriver at you 

 

also meant to help with grip in different conditions I think 

 

no idea if this was the justification for bringing them in years back though 

 

 

It's a huge advantage. They increase the stickiness of your hands and vastly reduce sting on inpact. Many types also protect against broken fingers. 

Your gardening gloves may not make you a better gardener, but they certainly improve your ability to grab a thorn and reduce cutting your hands. 

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1 hour ago, Cowshed said:

City Oz wearing quality modern football gloves is an advantage for a goalkeeper. The human hand cannot create as a effective a grip with the ball as it will wearing goalkeeping gloves. As footballs have evolved balls have become harder to catch and hold. Players dry balls to take long throws for a genuine reason - its protective surface is difficult to grip when wet. The panelling (not weight) of balls make them swing more again making them harder to catch hence gloves and less catching.

There is a psychological aspect to this. Wearing quality gloves makes a player feel different. More prepared, Complete. Confident.

Genuine question mate - do keepers wear `different` gloves depending on the weather? One sort if it`s wet, another if it`s cold and another for hot? If so, would they change them during a game if the weather changed?

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Yes is the answer LR.

Gloves have differing adherence levels balanced v weather. Wetter = higher adherence something like 40/50% higher v dry gloves, sticky enough to stick to a wall and stay suspended for a short period. If its starts raining change gloves.

Glove designs differs across continents due to differing climates.

Gloves may get changed during a game due to damage. Higher the grip the more delicate and less durable the glove is. One shot, cross frequently sees part of the glove coming apart .. Cheaper gloves are more durable but lack the grip and are less receptive to movement.

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21 minutes ago, Cowshed said:

Yes is the answer LR.

Gloves have differing adherence levels balanced v weather. Wetter = higher adherence something like 40/50% higher v dry gloves, sticky enough to stick to a wall and stay suspended for a short period. If its starts raining change gloves.

Glove designs differs across continents due to differing climates.

Gloves may get changed during a game due to damage. Higher the grip the more delicate and less durable the glove is. One shot, cross frequently sees part of the glove coming apart .. Cheaper gloves are more durable but lack the grip and are less receptive to movement.

Thanks mate, I`ve often wondered. You quite often see outfield players change boots/studs if the surface deteriorates but I can`t say I`ve ever noticed a goalie changing gloves.

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4 hours ago, internetjef said:

I think it’s more to prevent injury isn’t it? All the modern ones have finger supports fitted in the back to reduce chances of bending back / breaking a finger when someone hits a piledriver at you 

 

also meant to help with grip in different conditions I think 

 

no idea if this was the justification for bringing them in years back though 

 

 

I remember watching an interview with a keeper (can’t remember who) talking about how he used slightly different gloves to most pros.  He felt the big gloves (Sepp Maier types) with finger support reduced the feel of his hands on the ball, so went with smaller gloves with much less rigid support.

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Hi All, 

When as a GK and coach I saw this thread and was excited. 

I can see there's a bit of confusion so I'll try my best to answer the points raised above:

5 hours ago, fatchers said:

Goalkeepers knew how to catch a ball then. Now they wear gloves but can't catch a ball. 

As previously mentioned, the balls have changed vastly, even in the time I've been playing. In the days where keepers wore no gloves or their own contraptions on their hands, balls were primarily made of leather which is a more grippy and tactile surface. The weight of these balls means they didn't travel as quickly. Modern day footballs are all synthetic materials, and pitches are typically watered before games so the balls 'zip'. A typical player in the championship would be expected to be able to strike a ball at 60mph+. The speed, coupled with the lack of grip on the ball means gloves defiantly come in handy. I'd challenge anyone to catch a modern ball at that speed, without gloves, consistently. 

 

1 hour ago, Lanterne Rouge said:

Genuine question mate - do keepers wear `different` gloves depending on the weather? One sort if it`s wet, another if it`s cold and another for hot? If so, would they change them during a game if the weather changed?

Simple answer yes. 

Top manufactures such as Adidas for example or Uhlsport, who produce Bentley's glove of choice, produce a variety of products designed for wet grip typically branded as 'aqua' palms, right down to making specific gloves for AstroTurf. 

However, these specialist products are rarely used in the professional game, and are more what you'll see available in stores and online as a marketing gimmick to allow brands to profit more and diversify their range. In practice professional keepers typically keep the same pair of gloves for all situations. I was fortunate I used to get gloves from Franky when he had spares and the gloves the pros are given by sponsors are normally whats known as 'SMU' or specially manufactured units. These gloves have palms that aren't available in stores that offer the GK's superior grip in all conditions but the durability is poor, you'll see deterioration after one or two games. Which obviously inst an issue for a pro who gets multiple pairs a month but you wouldn't be too please had you spent £70 a pair to see them loose grip quickly.

Changing gloves in games

From my experience of playing and knowing a few professionals in the game, I would say this is unlikely. Goalkeepers are superstitious beasts. Using Frank as an example he used to train in his new gloves the week before a game to break them in then use them on match-day. Gloves don't typically perform too well fresh out the box so being worn in is essential for maximum performance. I know Frank used to have a new pair each game typically, but I have heard on occasion for keepers to switch at halftime to an older pair perhaps if they haven't had the most successful first half. 

40 minutes ago, Davefevs said:

I think it’s more to prevent injury isn’t it? All the modern ones have finger supports fitted in the back to reduce chances of bending back / breaking a finger when someone hits a piledriver at you 

Gloves to massively help prevent injury. The latex palms absorb the shock of the shot and dissipates it out. Gloves are usually a bit wider on the hand, to increase the contact area so obviously there's more area to save the ball with.

Interesting point raised in regards to spines or 'fingersaves' as they're often called. Yes, they can reduce risk of injury, but personally I find them really cumbersome and they reduce mobility of the hand a lot. Usually you'll find younger keepers wearing them where the hands are weaker and the technique isn't great.  In my experience, they're extremely rare in the professional game. Keepers tend to tape their fingers depending on were they need support, some do all 5 others do 1 or 2. The only keeper that springs to mind who wears fingersave gloves is Fabianski at West Ham.

In my experience, the most essential part of the glove to prevent injury is the wrist strap, this is massive in absorbing the shock of the impact of the ball. You have to think that your hands have just felt a 60mph impact and that force has to go somewhere. So the wrist straps help massively, they also support the wrist from bending back when parrying the ball away. It's extremely common for keepers to tape wrists under gloves, some going for a tiny bit, others for a look of a boxer. Rich O'Donnell used to tape up half his forearm for support. Each to their own, a good GK knows what works for them. 

 

Apologies for the lengthy post, hope it helps some understanding. I enjoyed writing about this! 

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7 minutes ago, Bailey is Right said:

Hi All, 

When as a GK and coach I saw this thread and was excited. 

I can see there's a bit of confusion so I'll try my best to answer the points raised above:

As previously mentioned, the balls have changed vastly, even in the time I've been playing. In the days where keepers wore no gloves or their own contraptions on their hands, balls were primarily made of leather which is a more grippy and tactile surface. The weight of these balls means they didn't travel as quickly. Modern day footballs are all synthetic materials, and pitches are typically watered before games so the balls 'zip'. A typical player in the championship would be expected to be able to strike a ball at 60mph+. The speed, coupled with the lack of grip on the ball means gloves defiantly come in handy. I'd challenge anyone to catch a modern ball at that speed, without gloves, consistently. 

 

Simple answer yes. 

Top manufactures such as Adidas for example or Uhlsport, who produce Bentley's glove of choice, produce a variety of products designed for wet grip typically branded as 'aqua' palms, right down to making specific gloves for AstroTurf. 

However, these specialist products are rarely used in the professional game, and are more what you'll see available in stores and online as a marketing gimmick to allow brands to profit more and diversify their range. In practice professional keepers typically keep the same pair of gloves for all situations. I was fortunate I used to get gloves from Franky when he had spares and the gloves the pros are given by sponsors are normally whats known as 'SMU' or specially manufactured units. These gloves have palms that aren't available in stores that offer the GK's superior grip in all conditions but the durability is poor, you'll see deterioration after one or two games. Which obviously inst an issue for a pro who gets multiple pairs a month but you wouldn't be too please had you spent £70 a pair to see them loose grip quickly.

Changing gloves in games

From my experience of playing and knowing a few professionals in the game, I would say this is unlikely. Goalkeepers are superstitious beasts. Using Frank as an example he used to train in his new gloves the week before a game to break them in then use them on match-day. Gloves don't typically perform too well fresh out the box so being worn in is essential for maximum performance. I know Frank used to have a new pair each game typically, but I have heard on occasion for keepers to switch at halftime to an older pair perhaps if they haven't had the most successful first half. 

Gloves to massively help prevent injury. The latex palms absorb the shock of the shot and dissipates it out. Gloves are usually a bit wider on the hand, to increase the contact area so obviously there's more area to save the ball with.

Interesting point raised in regards to spines or 'fingersaves' as they're often called. Yes, they can reduce risk of injury, but personally I find them really cumbersome and they reduce mobility of the hand a lot. Usually you'll find younger keepers wearing them where the hands are weaker and the technique isn't great.  In my experience, they're extremely rare in the professional game. Keepers tend to tape their fingers depending on were they need support, some do all 5 others do 1 or 2. The only keeper that springs to mind who wears fingersave gloves is Fabianski at West Ham.

In my experience, the most essential part of the glove to prevent injury is the wrist strap, this is massive in absorbing the shock of the impact of the ball. You have to think that your hands have just felt a 60mph impact and that force has to go somewhere. So the wrist straps help massively, they also support the wrist from bending back when parrying the ball away. It's extremely common for keepers to tape wrists under gloves, some going for a tiny bit, others for a look of a boxer. Rich O'Donnell used to tape up half his forearm for support. Each to their own, a good GK knows what works for them. 

 

Apologies for the lengthy post, hope it helps some understanding. I enjoyed writing about this! 

Thanks for that mate, I enjoyed reading it! It`s always interesting to get an insight into things we laypeople would never have a clue about otherwise.

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54 minutes ago, Bailey is Right said:

Hi All, 

When as a GK and coach I saw this thread and was excited. 

I can see there's a bit of confusion so I'll try my best to answer the points raised above:

As previously mentioned, the balls have changed vastly, even in the time I've been playing. In the days where keepers wore no gloves or their own contraptions on their hands, balls were primarily made of leather which is a more grippy and tactile surface. The weight of these balls means they didn't travel as quickly. Modern day footballs are all synthetic materials, and pitches are typically watered before games so the balls 'zip'. A typical player in the championship would be expected to be able to strike a ball at 60mph+. The speed, coupled with the lack of grip on the ball means gloves defiantly come in handy. I'd challenge anyone to catch a modern ball at that speed, without gloves, consistently. 

 

Simple answer yes. 

Top manufactures such as Adidas for example or Uhlsport, who produce Bentley's glove of choice, produce a variety of products designed for wet grip typically branded as 'aqua' palms, right down to making specific gloves for AstroTurf. 

However, these specialist products are rarely used in the professional game, and are more what you'll see available in stores and online as a marketing gimmick to allow brands to profit more and diversify their range. In practice professional keepers typically keep the same pair of gloves for all situations. I was fortunate I used to get gloves from Franky when he had spares and the gloves the pros are given by sponsors are normally whats known as 'SMU' or specially manufactured units. These gloves have palms that aren't available in stores that offer the GK's superior grip in all conditions but the durability is poor, you'll see deterioration after one or two games. Which obviously inst an issue for a pro who gets multiple pairs a month but you wouldn't be too please had you spent £70 a pair to see them loose grip quickly.

Changing gloves in games

From my experience of playing and knowing a few professionals in the game, I would say this is unlikely. Goalkeepers are superstitious beasts. Using Frank as an example he used to train in his new gloves the week before a game to break them in then use them on match-day. Gloves don't typically perform too well fresh out the box so being worn in is essential for maximum performance. I know Frank used to have a new pair each game typically, but I have heard on occasion for keepers to switch at halftime to an older pair perhaps if they haven't had the most successful first half. 

Gloves to massively help prevent injury. The latex palms absorb the shock of the shot and dissipates it out. Gloves are usually a bit wider on the hand, to increase the contact area so obviously there's more area to save the ball with.

Interesting point raised in regards to spines or 'fingersaves' as they're often called. Yes, they can reduce risk of injury, but personally I find them really cumbersome and they reduce mobility of the hand a lot. Usually you'll find younger keepers wearing them where the hands are weaker and the technique isn't great.  In my experience, they're extremely rare in the professional game. Keepers tend to tape their fingers depending on were they need support, some do all 5 others do 1 or 2. The only keeper that springs to mind who wears fingersave gloves is Fabianski at West Ham.

In my experience, the most essential part of the glove to prevent injury is the wrist strap, this is massive in absorbing the shock of the impact of the ball. You have to think that your hands have just felt a 60mph impact and that force has to go somewhere. So the wrist straps help massively, they also support the wrist from bending back when parrying the ball away. It's extremely common for keepers to tape wrists under gloves, some going for a tiny bit, others for a look of a boxer. Rich O'Donnell used to tape up half his forearm for support. Each to their own, a good GK knows what works for them. 

 

Apologies for the lengthy post, hope it helps some understanding. I enjoyed writing about this! 

Here’s a pair of Frankie’s match / training worn.  No finger protection.  They fit like a glove 😂

 

image.jpg

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15 hours ago, Kingswood Robin said:

Liam Brady could go past people like they weren't there

I was at the 1979 cup final and still dine out on the story of the winning goal...Liam Brady, no shin pads, socks down, weaving through the manure defence like a ski slalom to deliver the cross to Alan Sunderland to poke it in. Just thought I'd chip in to your thread with that😄✌️

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