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What’s the deal with football nicknames ?


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25 minutes ago, Cowshed said:

Your first sentence has most of the answer.

In football its due to the simplicity of communication. Names and gamespeak are shortened in an effort to create triggers. Hello Dean Holden can you please apply pressure to the player in possession becomes DEANO PRESS. The former is inefficient as a means of communicating on a football pitch, the latter is far easier for the brain to process via pre frontal cortex and cerebellum to the motor cortex.

Unwittingly this process becomes habit forming and an accepted norm. 

 

So why not “Dean, Press!” As it’s his name and less syllables to say. Or “Holden, Press!” As it is also his name, with the same amount of syllables as “Deano”.

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Nicknames seem to be the preserve of sportsmen now days, unlike when I was younger when nearly all my mates had nick names,Nizzle,Horse,Pink Pig,Whiskers,Gypo,Fishy,Pinhead etc.

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12 minutes ago, Distortia said:

So why not “Dean, Press!” As it’s his name and less syllables to say. Or “Holden, Press!” As it is also his name, with the same amount of syllables as “Deano”.

Because of the element of camaraderie and familiarity. In addition to being more efficient a nickname does convey a sense of a relationship between the name-caller and the object person. 

4 minutes ago, NOTBLUE said:

Nicknames seem to be the preserve of sportsmen now days, unlike when I was younger when nearly all my mates had nick names,Nizzle,Horse,Pink Pig,Whiskers,Gypo,Fishy,Pinhead etc.

My mates and I from school/uni basically just refer to everyone by their surname, although I and a couple of others have real nicknames.

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57 minutes ago, David Brent said:

Packy....in case anyone was wondering 

Could of been Packso! Why are so many Smiths called Smudger, Clarks called Nobby, Bakers called Spud? Mine derives from a Devo song and not really suitable in todays parlance

Edited by Med/MadHatter
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It’s just informality and familiarity isn’t it? My PE teachers/coaches all called me my surname + “Y”. It just fits doesn’t it? Shouting a name + “Y” or “O” just feels easier than shouting a full first or second name, even though it’s shorter. Plus, it’s just nice. 

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9 minutes ago, NOTBLUE said:

Nicknames seem to be the preserve of sportsmen now days, unlike when I was younger when nearly all my mates had nick names,Nizzle,Horse,Pink Pig,Whiskers,Gypo,Fishy,Pinhead etc.

Equally mysterious is when within a group of friends, some have nicknames and others don't: I know the friends of a particular friend of mine by their nicknames (Colonel, Bando and Wack), indeed I have no idea of their real names. By comparison my friend is just called by his actual name. No rhyme or reason.

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8 minutes ago, Distortia said:

So why not “Dean, Press!” As it’s his name and less syllables to say. Or “Holden, Press!” As it is also his name, with the same amount of syllables as “Deano”.

It could be. It is not exact. It is general and preference and personal and cultural ownership exist. Like game calls names will not make communication more difficult as football needs easily understandable pictures to be painted in players minds.  

 

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39 minutes ago, Distortia said:

So why not “Dean, Press!” As it’s his name and less syllables to say. Or “Holden, Press!” As it is also his name, with the same amount of syllables as “Deano”.

Blame John Barnes.

You've got to Holden give,

But do it at the right time....

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1 hour ago, WolfOfWestStreet said:

I dont get why every footballer called Matthew gets called Matty. Ive not once met a bloke called Matthew that goes by Matty rather than Matt. 

I will have a go at this and hope it makes sense.

Football requires a differing mindset. By naming somebody Matty in football and on the field the name is being associated with a footballers mindset. Its called anchoring. Shouting Matty on a pitch at a player triggers a different response and quicker than using Matthew or Matt. If that differing name is used frequently enough and more aggressively the responses are more deeply internalised and the mind will associate it more clearly with its differing role. Matty can behave differently on a pitch to the Mathew off it. 

Culturally (football) Matthews have become Mattys.

Edited by Cowshed
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55 minutes ago, Distortia said:

So why not “Dean, Press!” As it’s his name and less syllables to say. Or “Holden, Press!” As it is also his name, with the same amount of syllables as “Deano”.

Dean Press and Holden Press sound like publishing houses. Dean was certainly a publishing house (might still be) who used to do the abridged versions of classic novels I used to read as a boy. 

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11 minutes ago, RoystonFoote'snephew said:

Dean Press and Holden Press sound like publishing houses. Dean was certainly a publishing house (might still be) who used to do the abridged versions of classic novels I used to read as a boy. 

Holden press sounds like a Cider!

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3 hours ago, Cowshed said:

I will have a go at this and hope it makes sense.

Football requires a differing mindset. By naming somebody Matty in football and on the field the name is being associated with a footballers mindset. Its called anchoring. Shouting Matty on a pitch at a player triggers a different response and quicker than using Matthew or Matt. If that differing name is used frequently enough and more aggressively the responses are more deeply internalised and the mind will associate it more clearly with its differing role. Matty can behave differently on a pitch to the Mathew off it. 

Culturally (football) Matthews have become Mattys.

Thanks for trying but I don't understand. At least there is some logic to it then. 

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