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2 hours ago, phantom said:

I'm far from knowing anything about an F1 car, but is it not odd that there is such a neat split in the car?

Is it two sections joined together? 

Otherwise surely such a neat separation seems very odd to me 

I have been involved in several accident investigations, the idea of them is to learn what happened and make improvements, listening to the comments today, this circumstance was one that hadn’t been covered by previous experience of a car hitting a barrier on a straight at such an acute angle.   It would be fascinating to be involved and no doubt there will be some changes that come from the investigation.

The fact that the car split in two may not be significant, as the survival pod obviously stayed intact.

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6 minutes ago, Maesknoll Red said:

I have been involved in several accident investigations, the idea of them is to learn what happened and make improvements, listening to the comments today, this circumstance was one that hadn’t been covered by previous experience of a car hitting a barrier on a straight at such an acute angle.   It would be fascinating to be involved and no doubt there will be some changes that come from the investigation.

The fact that the car split in two may not be significant, as the survival pod obviously stayed intact.

Apparently the survival pod did exactly what it’s meant to in splitting from the rest. What’s no clear is should it have burst into flames - guessing not.

It reminded me of some of the footage of Lauda’s crash years ago and some of the fatalities from the 1970s. Scary thing is even 3 years ago without the Halo I reckon he’d be a goner 

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18 minutes ago, TomF said:

Apparently the survival pod did exactly what it’s meant to in splitting from the rest. What’s no clear is should it have burst into flames - guessing not.

It reminded me of some of the footage of Lauda’s crash years ago and some of the fatalities from the 1970s. Scary thing is even 3 years ago without the Halo I reckon he’d be a goner 

I thought he was a goner when I saw the crash....  it’s amazing that he got himself out and walked away (albeit aided) from that.  Listening to the Engineers thoughts that were reported, is that the fuel pod (tank) stayed intact and it was either fuel lines or the smaller fuel tank that takes the feed from the pod that was compromised.

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2 minutes ago, Maesknoll Red said:

I thought he was a goner when I saw the crash....  it’s amazing that he got himself out and walked away (albeit aided) from that.  Listening to the Engineers thoughts that were reported, is that the fuel pod (tank) stayed intact and it was either fuel lines or the smaller fuel tank that takes the feed from the pod that was compromised.

Seeing it live, I thought he was ok cos I’d seen the back end of the car away from the fire, but the angle we were watching from you couldn’t see the front was in the barrier on fire, so it was a lot worse than I thought it would be.

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Halo has done it's job there and some!! 

Actually missed this race, forgot what time it started and didn't know anything about this until about an hour ago. How he's alive is one thing, but able to walk (with help) and talk about it is a damn miracle.

Don't think anybody would blame him if he never got inside one of those cars again!!

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Yeah I'm really not convinced the barrier should be collapsing in like that. I get that barriers are designed to withstand a certain level of impact but what's happened here is very similar to what happened to Francois Cevert decades ago - part of the barrier has failed and part of it has survived. Unfortunately in the case of Cevert it essentially meant he was cut in half - and a similar fate would have happened to Grosjean had it not been for the staggering strength of the halo.

Another oddity is the fire itself which you very rarely see from an impact these days. Engine blow-outs were still common in the 90's and the 00's but since Berger at Imola back in the late 80's I can't think of an example of an F1 car catching fire from an impact alone.

A really strange crash for different reasons, and at the very least, this settles the halo debate once and for all. 

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4 hours ago, Maesknoll Red said:

Hamilton out of Sunday’s race, positive Covid test.

Out for last two races I'd wager, both countries have strict quarantine rules.

Personally I'd get George Russell (remember he's on loan to Williams from Merc) in there, lets see what he can really do with a decent car. 

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1 hour ago, elhombrecito said:

Would love George to be given a chance, but Williams need to give permission and I can't see it.

Apparently they’re discussing it, so sounds like it’s a possibility.  Thou if he goes and gets the gig and then outperforms Bottas that could be awkward 

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Williams driver George Russell will replace Lewis Hamilton at Mercedes for this weekend's Sakhir Grand Prix.

Hamilton has been forced to withdraw from the race in Bahrain after testing positive for Covid-19.

Williams reserve Jack Aitken will replace Russell.

"I might be wearing a different race suit this weekend, but I'm a Williams driver and I'll be cheering my team on every step of the way," said 22-year-old Russell.

"I see this as a great chance to learn from the best outfit on the grid right now and to come back as an improved driver, with even more energy and experience to help push Williams further up the grid. A big thank you also to Mercedes for putting their faith in me.

"Obviously, nobody can replace Lewis, but I'll give my all for the team in his absence from the moment I step in the car. Most importantly, I wish him a speedy recovery. I'm really looking forward to the opportunity and can't wait to get out on track this week."

Mercedes have guided Russell's career since 2017 and he was a Mercedes reserve driver in 2018 before they released him to Williams on a three-year contract from the start of the 2019 season.

He is highly rated by the team as a candidate for a potential future drive.

The Briton has tested several times for Mercedes but running him in Bahrain this weekend - as well as potentially the season-closing race in Abu Dhabi a week later if Hamilton does not recover in time - is a good opportunity for the team to assess his development in a competitive environment.

Mercedes inquired as to Williams' position on Russell in the summer before they confirmed Valtteri Bottas for the 2021 season, but were told they were not prepared to release him.

However, that was under Williams' previous management before their sale to the investment group Dorilton Capital in August.

"It will not be a straightforward task for George to make the transition from the Williams to the W11, but he is race-ready and has a detailed understanding of the 2020 tyres and how they perform on this generation of cars," said Mercedes chief Toto Wolff.

"George has shown impressive form this year with Williams, playing an instrumental role in their climb up the grid, and I am optimistic that he will deliver a strong performance alongside Valtteri [Bottas], who will be a demanding reference for him.

"This race will mark a small milestone for us, as we see a member of our Junior programme compete for the works Mercedes team for the first time."

Aitken, 25, will make his F1 debut when he takes to the grid this weekend.

A practice driver at the Styrian Grand Prix earlier this year, he has also competed in Formula 2 this season, earning two podiums and eight other points finishes. He finished fifth overall in F2 last season.

"I'm absolutely over the moon to have the opportunity to make my debut with Williams this coming weekend and I am extremely happy for George to have his chance too," said Aitken.

"I really mean it when I say I've felt very much at home since I joined Williams earlier this year, so to get my chance to help the team try to achieve that elusive points finish is an extremely satisfying occasion to say the least."

TAKEN FROM: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/formula1/55152354

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Adding proof to the fact that the car is the massive difference?

Possibly his lack of experience may be a difference come race day, but . . . . 

Britain's George Russell set the fastest time in first practice at the Sakhir Grand Prix as he had his first miles in Lewis Hamilton's Mercedes.

The 22-year-old, deputising after Hamilton contracted coronavirus, was 0.176 seconds quicker than Red Bull's Max Verstappen.

The second Mercedes of Valtteri Bottas was fourth, 0.322secs off the pace.

The Finn made a series of mistakes on his laps and damaged his car in an off-track moment at Turn Eight.

Russell, who is a Mercedes protege, has been driving for Williams since he made his F1 debut in 2019.

Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff decided he wanted to try Russell out in the car in Hamilton's absence rather than designated reserve driver Stoffel Vandoorne.

"P1 was a good session for him," said Wolff. "We need to calm everybody down - it was a first practice session on a really short track. But he delivered a really solid job in what we expect from him on a single lap.

"The long runs were difficult with our car and difficult to establish a benchmark because [Bottas] broke his car early on and it was difficult for him to stop it properly."

Russell, who has been a Mercedes young driver since 2017, has done a total of just over 6,500km of testing for the team but had not driven this year's car for real or in the simulator before this practice session.

He revealed on Thursday that he is having to wear driving boots one size too small to fit his size 11 feet in the car.

At 6ft 1in tall, Russell is five inches (14cm) taller than Hamilton.

He spent his first run acclimatising to the car and ended it a second slower than Bottas.

But on their second runs Russell went to the top of the timesheets on his first flying lap and Bottas started to make mistakes, apparently over-driving as he sought to match Russell's time, running wide at Turn Eight and having a wobble through Turn Two.

On his second flying lap of the run, Russell almost matched his first time, and then on his third he knocked a further 0.3secs off to end the session in impressive style.

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5 hours ago, TomF said:

First Practice and the LH hat0rs are out saying its all about the car.

Yeah so about Bottas 

Mercedes have by far and away the best car. There is no argument to that.

Bottas has had bad luck with parts breaking down this season, but he also just isn't as good a driver as Hamilton.

Mercedes will dominate again next season as well, just hoping 2022 has an actual competition for the titles after the rule changes come in.

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