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Bristol Rovers Dustbin Thread


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Before my time, but my parents and grandparents often told me how they watched city one week and the gas the next. Apparently lots of people did it. 

Joking aside, were my family unique or was that more common place when football was the equivalent of £2 a ticket?

I can't imagine any circumstance in modern football where that would happen. 

Perhaps the tribal rivalry wasn't as intense back then?

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Yes I have heard this too. I remember a kid at my primary school doing it, and that was in  the 1980s when things between fans were already toxic. 
 

But it must have been common in the days before getting to away games was feasible. 
 

I’m intrigued to know how people who did this chose which side to support in a derby match. 

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Yep, seems to have been pretty common “back in the day”.

I’m glad I got in to football at the time Rovers were in Bath, as I grew north of the river. My dad is an Argyle fan, so just took me to any team that was local. Could well have ended up on the other side of the fence if Rovers had still been playing in Bristol then.

Jeez, I’m off for a wash, I feel dirty.

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46 minutes ago, Matthew me said:

Joking aside, were my family unique or was that more common place when football was the equivalent of £2 a ticket?

I can remember paying £2.50 to stand on the East End in 1990ish.

Open end was £3.00 for some reason?

If I remember the atmosphere inside football grounds at that time correctly, I imagine there weren’t too many people visiting Ashton Gate one week and then going to Trumpton the following week unless your name is Roger Malone.

I believe it used to be a reasonably common occurrence in the 50’s and 60’s. Then we got promoted to the top flight in the 70s and the ‘Gas’ who would watch us one week and their own shower the next suddenly forgot where Eastville was.

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24 minutes ago, Peter O Hanraha-hanrahan said:

I can remember paying £2.50 to stand on the East End in 1990ish.

Open end was £3.00 for some reason?

If I remember the atmosphere inside football grounds at that time correctly, I imagine there weren’t too many people visiting Ashton Gate one week and then going to Trumpton the following week unless your name is Roger Malone.

I believe it used to be a reasonably common occurrence in the 50’s and 60’s. Then we got promoted to the top flight in the 70s and the ‘Gas’ who would watch us one week and their own shower the next suddenly forgot where Eastville was.

My word.... £2.50!

It's amazing how prices have increased about inflation. 

Arsenal being £90. A pound a minute for a game of football 

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7 hours ago, Matthew me said:

My word.... £2.50!

It's amazing how prices have increased about inflation. 

Arsenal being £90. A pound a minute for a game of football 

I remember when it was 50p......

People say it's relative but Im sure that would be cheeper in 'real terms'.

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9 hours ago, Matthew me said:

Before my time, but my parents and grandparents often told me how they watched city one week and the gas the next. Apparently lots of people did it. 

Joking aside, were my family unique or was that more common place when football was the equivalent of £2 a ticket?

I can't imagine any circumstance in modern football where that would happen. 

Perhaps the tribal rivalry wasn't as intense back then?

My Dad did that and actually met my mum at a Rovers match when City’s away game was called off him and his mates went to watch Rovers, would have been early/mid 70’s as I’m 41

Edited by Tinmans Love Child
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6 minutes ago, Tinmans Love Child said:

My Dad did that and actually met my mum at a Rovers match when City’s away game was called off him and his mates went to watch Rovers, would have been early/mid 70’s as I’m 41

Amazing isn't it. Hard to imagine you could watch both teams. But it looks like plenty of people did!

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I used to occasionally watch Rovers when I was at school in the 60s. Living closer to Eastville than Ashton Gate  it was relatively easy to get there (children used to actually walk long distances to places in those days). A lot of things were different including a lack of live football on TV and hardly any highlights. So if you wanted to watch a match when the team you supported wasn’t playing you had to go to watch another team. There was rivalry between the two sets of supporters then, but not the hatred you get now, so it didn’t seem strange for City supporters to occasionally watch Rovers and vice versa. Of course, when I went to Eastville I always supported the opposition 

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10 hours ago, Matthew me said:

Before my time, but my parents and grandparents often told me how they watched city one week and the gas the next. Apparently lots of people did it. 

Joking aside, were my family unique or was that more common place when football was the equivalent of £2 a ticket?

I can't imagine any circumstance in modern football where that would happen. 

Perhaps the tribal rivalry wasn't as intense back then?

The shared experience of the war years produced a lot of social cohesion that persisted probably into the sixties. The pathe news footage of Rovers v City games in the fifties doesn’t seem to show any fan segregation and games passed without trouble. I remember speaking to some people at Eastville who watched Rovers one week and City the next, something I can’t imagine doing.

While rivalry/banter between teams is part of being a football fan, the illogical vitriol that can be found on any of the football forums, towards people who enjoy the same sport and come from the same city, I have to say I find rather saddening.

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1 hour ago, pongo88 said:

I used to occasionally watch Rovers when I was at school in the 60s. Living closer to Eastville than Ashton Gate  it was relatively easy to get there (children used to actually walk long distances to places in those days). A lot of things were different including a lack of live football on TV and hardly any highlights. So if you wanted to watch a match when the team you supported wasn’t playing you had to go to watch another team. There was rivalry between the two sets of supporters then, but not the hatred you get now, so it didn’t seem strange for City supporters to occasionally watch Rovers and vice versa. Of course, when I went to Eastville I always supported the opposition 

Just to confirm other posters my mum and dad used to watch both team right through the 50's, but were always City first. You have to remember that travelling away was more of a one off special than an every week event. 

When I started going to watch City in the mid sixties, if we weren't home we would go to the reserves games, Rovers if they played anyone of note (I remember games against Chelsea, Southampton and Sunderland) or Bath City. My mother was disabled so we rarely travelled away and if we did the furthest I think we went was Birmingham.

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11 hours ago, Matthew me said:

Before my time, but my parents and grandparents often told me how they watched city one week and the gas the next. Apparently lots of people did it. 

Joking aside, were my family unique or was that more common place when football was the equivalent of £2 a ticket?

I can't imagine any circumstance in modern football where that would happen. 

Perhaps the tribal rivalry wasn't as intense back then?

Quite a common occurrence then..

My father was what you might call "open minded" and of course at Ashton to watch his reds with me one week,,,the next we'd be at eastville meeting his rovers supporting pal - a great guy,,won an MM in WW2....a very unassuming man as such people often are..

Seemed a normal thing for us to do at the time..very happy memories.

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1 hour ago, Matthew me said:

Amazing isn't it. Hard to imagine you could watch both teams. But it looks like plenty of people did!

The thing is in the 70’s there were no games on Tv in the pub to watch or anything like that, so if you wanted to watch football and your team was not playing then it was the logical thing to do, from speaking to my Dad about it He was always a City fan but also a fan of football

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46 minutes ago, Lanterne Rouge said:

It`s the mighty Doncaster United away for them today I believe.

Yes it is. Even despite the lack of attendance, I'm sure they've produced a lovely crystal vase to present to the match sponsors. 

"Doncaster Rovers Vs Bristol Albion" 

It's such a nice touch...! 

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12 hours ago, Matthew me said:

Before my time, but my parents and grandparents often told me how they watched city one week and the gas the next. Apparently lots of people did it. 

Joking aside, were my family unique or was that more common place when football was the equivalent of £2 a ticket?

I can't imagine any circumstance in modern football where that would happen. 

Perhaps the tribal rivalry wasn't as intense back then?

Christ!

If any of my family had done this no matter what generation, they would have been disowned and ridiculed forever!

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12 hours ago, Matthew me said:

Before my time, but my parents and grandparents often told me how they watched city one week and the gas the next. Apparently lots of people did it. 

Joking aside, were my family unique or was that more common place when football was the equivalent of £2 a ticket?

I can't imagine any circumstance in modern football where that would happen. 

Perhaps the tribal rivalry wasn't as intense back then?

My dad and his brothers did it in the late 1940’s early 50’s until one day when city were away my grandad was ready to take his boys to eastville , when my dad said to him . I don’t want to go to rovers anymore , city’s my team 😊

How lucky was I . If he’d gone the other way , I’d be a bitter sand twisted sag now  

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My first City game was at Eastville when our Cubs leader (a gashead, though the term hadn't been invented then, let alone adopted by the masochistic oddbods) took us along to a Glos. Cup Final. Looking back undoubtedly with the sinister aim of indoctrinating us all to become Rovers' supporters. Fortunately I took an immediate dislike to the look of Rovers' vile shirts and their even more putrid club song, City won handsomely, and I departed Eastville that night as a new City supporter - much to the chagrin of the failed gas brainwasher.

Went to Eastville a few times to watch games in the early 70's - Man.Utd, Watney Cup Final, Southampton and Ipswich in the Cup - but certainly not to support Rovers!

Also v. West Ham when a City away game was called off last minute and we were already assembled to go.

Never wished them anything but a crushing defeat, then and since.

Have to say I wouldn't dream of going anywhere near their current pit now unless City were about to give them a well deserved thrashing.

Edited by Nogbad the Bad
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7 minutes ago, Nogbad the Bad said:

My first City game was at Eastville when our scout master (a gashead, though the term hadn't been invented then, let alone adopted by the masochistic oddbods) took us along to a Glos. Cup Final. Looking back undoubtedly with the sinister aim of indoctrinating us all to become Rovers' supporters. Fortunately I took an immediate dislike to the look of Rovers' vile shirts and their even more putrid club song, City won handsomely, and I departed Eastville that night as a new City supporter - much to the chagrin of the failed gas brainwasher.

Went to Eastville a few times to watch games in the early 70's - Man.Utd, Watney Cup Final, Southampton and Ipswich in the Cup - but certainly not to support Rovers!

Also v. West Ham when a City away game was called off last minute and we were already assembled to go.

Never wished them anything but a crushing defeat, then and since.

Have to say I wouldn't dream of going anywhere near their current pit now unless City were about to give them a well deserved thrashing.

After that lot sold Gary mabbutt to spurs , they arranged a friendly with the fewers as part of the deal . The junior football club I played for (Somerdale wanderers) we’re given free tickets , thankfully In the muller rd end. Me & a mate noticed the gate was unlocked and walked across the dog track, sat right behind the net and started chatting to Ray Clemence 😂

Edited by steviestevieneville
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12 hours ago, Matthew me said:

Before my time, but my parents and grandparents often told me how they watched city one week and the gas the next. Apparently lots of people did it. 

Joking aside, were my family unique or was that more common place when football was the equivalent of £2 a ticket?

I can't imagine any circumstance in modern football where that would happen. 

Perhaps the tribal rivalry wasn't as intense back then?

As others have said, it was commonplace before (impossible to believe now, yes !)

My late father always took an interest in the 15ers results.

We would watch that crappy teleprinter thing on BBC1 where the results would come in. Always looking for the City result first of course.

"City won !" he would shout. This would then be followed by a "Oh, the Rovers won as well !". That outcome always made him happiest.

"But Dad," I would reply, "We want the Rovers to lose !"

(I never did tell him about the goings on at my primary school where we reds were in the minority, and why I despised the sags).

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For a very brief time I myself watched City and Rovers alternately. When I was a young lad in the mid-70s my mate's old man, who just liked to watch football and was not at all partisan, started taking us to whichever Bristol side was at home each Saturday.

For me at the time this was quite an eye-opener. Even then The Gap was huge and obvious. Everything about City was far superior, the quality of the football, the stadium, the size of the crowds, the atmosphere.

Fair to say my colours were nailed to the mast almost immediately, and within a few weeks I started becoming strangely 'unavailable' when Rovers were at home. Correct decision made; a life of derision and inferiority averted :city: 

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I can recall back in the mid 80s and a girl I was going out with at the time had the unfortunate disposition that her dad was a staunch gas head, her sister was married to a Walsall fan and they were playing at Eastville in a league game and invited me down with them knowing I was city through and through

Having stood in the run down inclosure listening to them moan and berate their players and watching what was a dire game end up 0-0 I said at the end to my girlfriends dad. That was s**t and why I am red through & through 

About 2 months later I dumped her and put it down as a bullet dodged 😃

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16 hours ago, Matthew me said:

Before my time, but my parents and grandparents often told me how they watched city one week and the gas the next. Apparently lots of people did it. 

Joking aside, were my family unique or was that more common place when football was the equivalent of £2 a ticket?

I can't imagine any circumstance in modern football where that would happen. 

Perhaps the tribal rivalry wasn't as intense back then?

Same for me, my Dad used to do the same in the 50s and 60s, but luckily for me my Mums Dad steered me towards City :laugh:

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