Jump to content

Welcome to One Team in Bristol - Bristol City Forums

Welcome to One Team in Bristol - Bristol City Forums, like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be a part of One Team in Bristol - Bristol City Forums by signing in or creating an account.

  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Full access to all forums (not all viewable as guest)
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members.
  • Support OTIB with a premium membership

Olé

Match Report: City turn up late to their own party

Recommended Posts

I wasn't there but listening on the radio, these marks reflect the impression I had of the game.  Basically, Williams held everything together and if we'd had any other combination at CH, we'd have been mauled.  Those writing Smith off in favour of Henriksen should have a think. We are so much better when both Willams and Smith are playing, even if there are better technical alternatives.

It's called character...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good report . Regarding Luke Ayling on the Radio Leeds phone in after the match a Leeds fan gleefully reported that in their area of the ground they call falling down cheaply to win a free kick as “being Ayling’d”.

Edited by Thameswey Red
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Makes uncomfortable reading, but as ever, thanks Ole for your comprehensive analysis...........need Smith and Benkovic back for WBA game. also good to see Kalas back.  Maybe backline of Kalas, Benkovic, Williams and Dasilva maybe way to go?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great honest report. Mirrored the feel I got from listening to the match on radio Brizzle.  Seems we dodged a right mauling.  Also fair play to the 1000 or so who attended and made themselves heard, on a difficult day out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just watched highlights from various sources and Bentleigh stopped us loosing 4- 0. It’s a well deserved 9.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched the game on Robins TV and I thought we were very poor. Totally overrun and when we did get the ball we gave it straight back to them. Leeds were in poor form leading up to our game but we gave them the initiative from the start with our formation that left us chasing shadows. How we only lost by one was nothing short of miraculous thanks to Bentley. We looked lost with no plan in the first half and although we were better in the second I couldn't see us scoring. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good summary as usual, if somewhat generous ratings.

Virtually all the pre-match comments in the "Team for Leeds" thread warned that we should not set-up with only 2 in CM against Leeds or else we would get overrun and that is exactly what happened. Although we should have had a pen second half, if it had finished 6-1 we could not have complained on the balance of play.

 

 

Edited by old_eastender
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spot on. 
We were very lucky to be only one down. We kept looking at the clock on the screen and thinking it was only a matter of time.

They came through AW and JD like a knife through butter. And made Ayling look like a world beater.

And talking of dear old Luke. Did you see his face on the banner outside the shop?

Luke Ayling. The face of Leeds United. Christ alive 😳

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty much agree with a lot of those ratings.

We were poor but Leeds were exceptional. Thought Weimann starting was a mistake. And bringing on Palmer was a mistake. Oh and 442 was a mistake too.

Even Sheffield Wednesday who are typically a 442 side went 4141 and beat them 2-0. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Thameswey Red said:

Good report . Regarding Luke Ayling on the Radio Leeds phone in after the match a Leeds fan gleefully reported that in their area of the ground they call falling down cheaply to win a free kick as “being Ayling’d”.

I watched the LUFC stream and the commentators were saying the same. “ That’s what Ayling does”  Anyone goes near him and he goes down!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, swanker said:

I watched the LUFC stream and the commentators were saying the same. “ That’s what Ayling does”  Anyone goes near him and he goes down!

 

But surely as a coaching team you have watched the videos before the game and you tell your players to just not touch him, there were so many times that he was in trouble and he was just waiting for the city player to touch him in the back and dutifully they did every bloody time. 

Agree with the ratings in general, but can't agree with Dasilva, he is a full back and his primary job is to defend and at that he was bloody awful all game, Costa is an average player at this level and Jay made him look like bloody Robben, never closing him down yet still allowing enough space inside for midfield runner to walk through. 

We will never improve defensively while we have Dasilva and Hunt as our full backs, every team targets our flanks, because they can expose our full backs if they have anything other than a poor winger at this level. 

  • Aubergine 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Spud55 said:

But surely as a coaching team you have watched the videos before the game and you tell your players to just not touch him, there were so many times that he was in trouble and he was just waiting for the city player to touch him in the back and dutifully they did every bloody time. 

Agree with the ratings in general, but can't agree with Dasilva, he is a full back and his primary job is to defend and at that he was bloody awful all game, Costa is an average player at this level and Jay made him look like bloody Robben, never closing him down yet still allowing enough space inside for midfield runner to walk through. 

We will never improve defensively while we have Dasilva and Hunt as our full backs, every team targets our flanks, because they can expose our full backs if they have anything other than a poor winger at this level. 

So you're say De Silva isn't up to the Job. I've heard it all now, why don't you go and watch the Teletubbies or something!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good summary Ole save as I've written elsewhere we gave Ayling and Dallas every reason to tumble over easily given we, too, pulled them back at every opportunity.

Like the rest of our midfield Massengo wasn't at the races first half, we chased shadows and, combined, failed to put in a single, meaningful challenge. He slightly made up for it second half with some storming runs save he had nobody to whom to lay off the ball.

I've never been a huge fan of Patterson & CoD but thought they showed the brightest of attitudes when given the chance.

Wells hugely disappointing in his lack of hold up.

Agreed Bentley MoM but he again showed that whilst a great shot stopper his lack of authority in the box sometimes is the cause of the attempts he later has to save; the wondersave at the end a case in point. Yesterday he was far better than of late and did come and catch (occasionally punch) a few (they were heavily working on this during the warm up.) For sure without him we'd have shipped half a dozen.

Leeds, as a few other have sussed, worked out when given sod all cover (as with the non-existant Weimann yesterday) DaSilva struggles to cope with the diagonal ball over the top. Not DaSilva's fault as had Weimann been there he could have dropped deeper to cover but when he is such exposed he's made to look defensively inadequate in the process.

Management ratings - well they were again wholly outfoxed and unable to compensate for their failings.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, marksy said:

So you're say De Silva isn't up to the Job. I've heard it all now, why don't you go and watch the Teletubbies or something!

So he didn't get absolutely schooled by Costa yesterday then? A player even Leeds fans think isn't good enough? Defensively he is poor, he's young so has time to improve, but if you can explain to me how yesterday was acceptable from a defensive point of view then I will happily have a discussion, however judging by your reply you seem to just be a *****. 

  • Aubergine 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Olé said:

Weimann 4 - First thing he did was come off. For half hour he drifted around looking to get set but never defended or attacked

So, a Johnson decision that finally came off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, swanker said:

I watched the LUFC stream and the commentators were saying the same. “ That’s what Ayling does”  Anyone goes near him and he goes down!

 

Also watched on Robins TV, the ref was doing my head in, every time we started to get near their box Ayling or another player would just go down and ref would just give ridiculous soft free kicks (Robins TV were making comments about how has the ref given that), any 50/50 was obviously a foul on the leeds player, not saying we could or deserved anything from the game but that pr1ck made it near impossible

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know who Chris Dunlavy is, but his report and assessment in the football league paper today is spot on.

All of our defenders got 7 or 8 with either comments being, excellent, superb, terrific, brave, commited.

Further comments

Eliasson 4...did nothing but run down blind alleys and didn't track back with Dallas.

HNM 5... overwhelmed in the centre, quick and energetic, but chasing shadows.

Pato 5...unable to influence the game either as a midfielder or support Striker.

Weimann 4...had just 8 touches before coming off.

Mentions about LJ saying some players went hiding and lacking guts.

The best line for me was...given the prize at stake and Leeds crisis of confidence, it was a surprise to see LJs men concede territory and impetus with what appeared a suicidal strategy of containment.

For me out GK and defenders were terrific. Most of the rest were useless and many went hiding. And LJ chose the wrong formation and some players shouldn't have even been on the pitch.

LJ and some of the players got it wrong.

 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, spudski said:

I don't know who Chris Dunlavy is, but his report and assessment in the football league paper today is spot on.

All of our defenders got 7 or 8 with either comments being, excellent, superb, terrific, brave, commited.

Further comments

Eliasson 4...did nothing but run down blind alleys and didn't track back with Dallas.

HNM 5... overwhelmed in the centre, quick and energetic, but chasing shadows.

Pato 5...unable to influence the game either as a midfielder or support Striker.

Weimann 4...had just 8 touches before coming off.

Mentions about LJ saying some players went hiding and lacking guts.

The best line for me was...given the prize at stake and Leeds crisis of confidence, it was a surprise to see LJs men concede territory and impetus with what appeared a suicidal strategy of containment.

For me out GK and defenders were terrific. Most of the rest were useless and many went hiding. And LJ chose the wrong formation and some players shouldn't have even been on the pitch.

LJ and some of the players got it wrong.

 

I agree with that.

Williams had a very good game as did Baker.

Whilst Dasilva's positioning is suspect (something I think he will get right in time) he had no support at all from senior players who should have seen he had two runners at him all the first half. He did well really.

Midfield ? What midfield ?

I'll excuse 18 year old Massengo as he kept going and didn't hide at all despite having a poor game by his standards, but the others were crap and, as LJ correctly said, gutless.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, bcfc01 said:

I agree with that.

Williams had a very good game as did Baker.

Whilst Dasilva's positioning is suspect (something I think he will get right in time) he had no support at all from senior players who should have seen he had two runners at him all the first half. He did well really.

Midfield ? What midfield ?

I'll excuse 18 year old Massengo as he kept going and didn't hide at all despite having a poor game by his standards, but the others were crap and, as LJ correctly said, gutless.

 

Totally agree...

This is also a damning report...

https://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/sport/football/leeds-united/madness-air-and-championship-leeds-united-show-theres-still-gulf-between-them-and-bristol-city-graham-smyths-verdict-1742121?fbclid=IwAR2_4XckMS6Z813CHWvGwnP6yJY-682o7qd59Ah2m2quEPd99_zhS8p0N_M

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, spudski said:

I don't know who Chris Dunlavy is, but his report and assessment in the football league paper today is spot on.

All of our defenders got 7 or 8 with either comments being, excellent, superb, terrific, brave, commited.

Further comments

Eliasson 4...did nothing but run down blind alleys and didn't track back with Dallas.

HNM 5... overwhelmed in the centre, quick and energetic, but chasing shadows.

Pato 5...unable to influence the game either as a midfielder or support Striker.

Weimann 4...had just 8 touches before coming off.

Mentions about LJ saying some players went hiding and lacking guts.

The best line for me was...given the prize at stake and Leeds crisis of confidence, it was a surprise to see LJs men concede territory and impetus with what appeared a suicidal strategy of containment.

For me out GK and defenders were terrific. Most of the rest were useless and many went hiding. And LJ chose the wrong formation and some players shouldn't have even been on the pitch.

LJ and some of the players got it wrong.

 

As a number of posters on here pointed out before the game the crisis was on the whole in the media's mind. 

As you saw yesterday we simply cannot turn possession and shots into enough goals to reflect our dominance. If Wells had scored yesterday it would have been symptomatic of our season. And yet when we turned in a performance that was very similar to yesterday against Cardiff we sailed into a 3-0 lead and still somehow contrived to draw 3-3.

If anyone thinks that we went into yesterday in some sort of siege mode then they're wrong. We just carried on doing what we do because there is no other way under Bielsa.

You probably don't need my 'support' but while you were well beaten yesterday that doesn't mean that you're rubbish. When we're in that mood it doesn't really matter what players and formation is put out against us. But this is the Championship, and you very nearly came a way with a point. One thing you did not do is capitulate.

  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, SR1 said:

As a number of posters on here pointed out before the game the crisis was on the whole in the media's mind. 

As you saw yesterday we simply cannot turn possession and shots into enough goals to reflect our dominance. If Wells had scored yesterday it would have been symptomatic of our season. And yet when we turned in a performance that was very similar to yesterday against Cardiff we sailed into a 3-0 lead and still somehow contrived to draw 3-3.

If anyone thinks that we went into yesterday in some sort of siege mode then they're wrong. We just carried on doing what we do because there is no other way under Bielsa.

You probably don't need my 'support' but while you were well beaten yesterday that doesn't mean that you're rubbish. When we're in that mood it doesn't really matter what players and formation is put out against us. But this is the Championship, and you very nearly came a way with a point. One thing you did not do is capitulate.

Totally agree...however most supporters on here, would love to watch that week in week out.

We sit 3 points off third, yet it's probably been one of the most drab seasons to watch.

Most of the frustration on here comes down to the almost anti football being played. It really hasn't been entertaining. It's often hard to watch. 

It's a mental league where anyone can beat anyone.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, swanker said:

I watched the LUFC stream and the commentators were saying the same. “ That’s what Ayling does”  Anyone goes near him and he goes down!

 

Yes, this is what he does. He takes the piss..         

 

 

 

 

and throws it over the balcony   ..    No, no, no  in fairness, I know it was his mate that did the dirty deed and not him.

Edited by AppyDAZE
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was obvious illness. Weimann wanted to come off and went down the tunnel to throw up, thus LJ ‘deciding’ to take him off was a bit of a misnomer. Diehdou also had the same sickness. Shit happens.
 

I won’t read to much into this one. However it makes the WBA game quite a prospect. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, spudski said:

That report really summed up our day.  I mentioned on a different thread it should have been 5 or 6. Better be some scratching of heads by the 3 wise men this week, and I do not want to hear it’s another tough championship game in pre match press conferences.  Not expecting anything against WBA but always hoping. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gutless and `Outclassed.................except Bentley, Williams, Baker amd Massengo.   How we only conceded 1 goal was a miracle.  We were tactically inept.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Spud55 said:

So he didn't get absolutely schooled by Costa yesterday then? A player even Leeds fans think isn't good enough? Defensively he is poor, he's young so has time to improve, but if you can explain to me how yesterday was acceptable from a defensive point of view then I will happily have a discussion, however judging by your reply you seem to just be a *****. 

Most fullbacks get schooled by Costa. He can beat a man in his sleep, thats not the issue. The issue is his inability to pick out a white shirt when hes beat his man. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/02/2020 at 22:43, Olé said:

With City in form and Leeds out of it, the game at a packed Elland Road would be decided by whether confident City came out punching. We'll regret our decision not to. Torn to shreds in a one sided first 20 and lined up in unconventional formation the players were obviously uncomfortable with, Lee Johnson's side folded quickly.

The only surprise is that Leeds, somehow, did not win by more. City's goal survived a charmed life thanks to both man of the match Bentley, the woodwork, and Leeds absence of predatory striking despite the drive of their support players into forward channels. City rallied in the second half but rarely troubled the home keeper.

In fact goalscorer Ayling should have been flagged for a penalty in the second period, whilst he and teammate Dallas regularly curtailed City strikers by tumbling cheaply and awfully to buy free kicks, but despite this soft touch and gamesmanship stalling City's rally, in truth they never got close to the home keeper and deserved nothing.

Played in gale force winds and sporadic driving rain, Leeds were all over makeshift City right from the start. In the first minute Costa got in from the right - as he'd do all day - City twice cutting it out for a corner before Cooper headed just over far post. In minutes Costa again tore past Dasilva, cut in and saw Bentley hold his low cross.

In response City lacked shape or idea and on 7 minutes Paterson skipped away from defenders and won a free kick, but punted the ball into the crowd himself, a reminder that the wind was playing havoc with high balls. On 11 a rapid City break saw Wells turn smartly on halfway and set Weimann in, the striker beaten by the first defender.

It was literally all Leeds, roared on by their bumper crowd, and on quarter of an hour the relentless pressure told. Ayling started and finished the move, driving on into the City box and fashioning a series of shots for which the visitors could not clear their lines, retrieved beyond the far post to be turned back inside for Ayling to lash home.

Everything was coming down City's left as the anonymous Weimann offered Dasilva no support, the full back torched over and over, and his attempt at a quick break was curtailed by a poor pass, a quick ball in by Leeds put Costa clear to force a parry by Bentley, chaos again as Dallas hit the bar and Bamford was offside with the tap in.

City were second to everything and found their long ball response swept away in the wind, but after an utterly one sided start by the Yorkshire hosts, finally the match settled as City started to adjust to Leeds driving channel runs, Dasilva in particular improving, the introduction of O'Dowda for Weimann decisive in delivering an outlet. 

The Irish substitute actually ran at Leeds as well as tracking his opponents off the ball, with a purpose that City had lacked while Weimann floated about. His second run down the left got the ball to the byline and cut it back for Dasilva, whose cross met Paterson drifting in to nod a stooping header easily into the keepers hands.

Lee Johnson's side went in well beaten at the break yet miraculously only one down, and they at least returned after the break with much needed purpose. In just 3 a well worked, typically patient move switched play right, to where Kalas fed Eliasson, his curling cross met Ayling, falling, edge of the box, hand out, pushing the ball away.

The officials, consistent but continously appeasing home fans as Leeds repeatedly pulled back City breaks without any cards, inevitably decided this also wasn't worthy of a penalty for fear of upsetting the large turn out. Frustrating but hardly decisive as the visitors had been worth nothing on the day - Leeds attacks still far more incisive.  

Again the match settled and it wasn't until sickness-hit striker Diedhiou came on for the tricky but ultimately overrun Paterson, that City finally had the target and outlet they needed. And yet it triggered another Leeds swarming, marauding push to seal their win. Speaking to Leeds fans Helder Costa isn't up to it. We made him a star.

Midway through the half Costa again went clear from the right, cut inside and slipped a ball across goal to Bamford to apply the finish. Somehow Bentley was able to claw it away and give his defence time to clear off the line. Minutes later a diagonal Costa run went clean through, rounding Bentley, the keeper somehow recovering to deflect.

By now City were pushed up and had their hosts pinned back, building methodically and yet rarely actually troubling their box. So often the visitors channel runs over the top were met by Leeds defenders - Dallas and Ayling - diving theatrically under any pressure, counting on the ref to stall the visitors forays with the softest of fouls.

Kasey Palmer came on for Eliasson, a fleet footed wing threat for all of 10 second half minutes, and inside 80 minutes City's only chance arrived. It needed just one chance to level things up, Diedhiou dropping and winning a forward ball in a crowd, taking it in stride, releasing Wells off the last man, racing in to flash a shot just over the angle. 

City's moment to steal a smash and grab point - missed. In the 83rd minute Leeds again seemed certain to add to their lead. Dallas played it into Harrison's run and he slammed a first time rising shot onto angle of bar and post, bundled away by Massengo. In injury time Diedhiou lost out  and sub Augustin drilled wide with one to beat.

The play off chasing away side had never looked like earning anything from the day, and despite having settled and fashioned a penalty shout and Wells chance, always looked second best to wave after wave of decisive Leeds break, the hosts conviction and drive shone through, and City would regret letting them dominate the opening.

 

Bentley 9 Kept City in the game when it seemed improbable - easily a 3-0 or 4-0 without him, man of the match

Kalas 6 He's played right back before but was unconventional and he and Dasilva had no answer for Leeds channel runs

Dasilva 6 Awful for 20 minutes and torn to pieces, adjusted and about our best for the rest including storming runs beyond his markers. But proof we need defence.

Baker 6 Largely dominant in the air but part of a core defence that was tipped to shreds in the opening half hour

Williams 7 Still the best of our defence, he is the last man onto forward balls, yet can push up at the end and retain possession - criminally underrated by supporters

Hendricksen 6 Solid but second to most loose balls and passing off target

Massengo 7 Often out muscled but gets a high score for the energy and desire that he showed - the only one chasing around after Leeds players, touches didn't always come off but always looking to beat people

Eliasson 6 Had a purple patch at the start of the second half where he bamboozled defenders and found crosses (Ayling save ruined the best) but never got going long enough to bring City strikers into play 

Paterson 6 Briefly our best player for the early exchanges as has the nearest touch and poise - but unlike other games totally out muscled before he can figure 

Weimann 4 First thing he did was come off. For half hour he drifted around looking to get set but never defended or attacked

Wells 6 Missed our best chance but more will come, always neater than we have seen when dropping to control the ball - definitely an upgrade 

 

O'Dowda 7 Been terrible all season but was our best outlet and massive upgrade over Weimann, ran with confidence and got tight when defending, frustration was Leeds defenders just dived to the floor if he touched them - must have Coronavirus

Diedhiou 6 Won several big headers and an outlet we had lacked for an hour, but never got in a position to score and rarely found by Eliasson bar a five minute spell

Palmer 5 Exciting to see him play with Wells and Diedhiou off him but didn't get a chance to run with the ball

Wasn’t at the game but based on what others have said about Massengo I’m very shocked you gave a high mark!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 16/02/2020 at 11:02, Spud55 said:

So he didn't get absolutely schooled by Costa yesterday then? A player even Leeds fans think isn't good enough? Defensively he is poor, he's young so has time to improve, but if you can explain to me how yesterday was acceptable from a defensive point of view then I will happily have a discussion, however judging by your reply you seem to just be a *****. 

Don't know what game you were watching, from what i seen he did well on Saturday. But i suppose it's all about opinions. Some on here rate O'Dowda and others were calling Fammy a donkey only a couple of months ago?

Anyway, why on earth would i want a discussion with you, you keyboard pussy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, marksy said:

Don't know what game you were watching, from what i seen he did well on Saturday. But i suppose it's all about opinions. Some on here rate O'Dowda and others were calling Fammy a donkey only a couple of months ago?

Anyway, why on earth would i want a discussion with you, you keyboard pussy!

Aww did someone say something you don't agree with, it's ok snowflake. I Shall stick you on ignore and be done with it. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Spud55 said:

Aww did someone say something you don't agree with, it's ok snowflake. I Shall stick you on ignore and be done with it. 

You're going to put me on ignore? You've ruined my night, straight up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 16/02/2020 at 20:10, bcfc01 said:

I agree with that.

Williams had a very good game as did Baker.

Whilst Dasilva's positioning is suspect (something I think he will get right in time) he had no support at all from senior players who should have seen he had two runners at him all the first half. He did well really.

Midfield ? What midfield ?

I'll excuse 18 year old Massengo as he kept going and didn't hide at all despite having a poor game by his standards, but the others were crap and, as LJ correctly said, gutless.

 

Midfield ? What midfield ?   This has been our problem for how many seasons now, most supporters have seen this for the same amount of time, why haven't players of quality been signed to address this problem?  The money has been there, why, oh, why can't the powers that be see it as well. Could make the difference between getting promotion and just being an average Championship team.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Charlie BCFC said:

Wasn’t at the game but based on what others have said about Massengo I’m very shocked you gave a high mark!

Imho the only one of our 4 starting midfielders who had anything like a decent game.  He massively helped a poor triumvirate of Baker, Dasilva and Paterson in the opening 30 minutes, probably to the detriment of helping Henriksen.  His interceptions, ball recoveries, etc were very high in number on Saturday trying to stem to tide.  Without him getting a grip (of sorts) in there it might’ve been worse.

It’s what Smith would get credit for, but it seems with Han-Noah it’s taken more for granted and everyone focuses analysis of him on the ball.  Don’t get me wrong he does need to improve on the ball.  It’s a bit chicken and egg though.  If he was asked to play as a true DM in say a 4141, like Smith, but with less responsibility for progressing attacks, I think he’d be able to show us more of what he can do.  But it’s a very responsible position for an 18 year old.  It’s not dissimilar to Morrell for Wales where Giggs gave him the DM role and told him to just do that....which he did with aplomb.

His early games in the 532/5212 predominantly alongside Brownhill, but importantly with Palmer, meant all he had to do was “get it” and “give it”.  Both Brownhill and more so Palmer had the adventurous mentality, even if Josh constrained himself to help Han-Noah settle in.

There was one occasion in the second half where he intercepted on the left half of the pitch and broke forward at pace.  Instead of one of our forwards (Pato and Wells I think) breaking into the free left channel (as Ayling was caught forward), both rang long and right, meaning the smart pass / easier pass wasn’t on....and the move broke down.  It’s little things like that means he’ll get the criticism, but I think there are mitigating circumstances.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bloke who does these reports expresses himself in a prosaic manner, but I thought (possibly wrongly) that you might be interested in it. Although he is critical of you he is also painfully aware, as are most of us, of our immense fallibility and over-achievement.

https://www.thesquareball.net/leeds-united/leeds-united-1-0-bristol-city-starting-again/?fbclid=IwAR12sFfT_K76wBrsEnHjvtHTizFX2AHPyFto4BRJ0htVWxM6ttaHheuXYaM

Elland Road never got its second goal on Saturday. Leeds United promised and promised, tormented and teased, but it was Barnsley who obliged. Even their score was held tantalisingly back from the list of results on the big screen, but the noise when their 3-0 win over Fulham was revealed was as loud as it would have been for any Leeds goal. It sounded like joy, excitement and relief, and an awful lot like belief.

The minutes after full-time were maybe the best of the day, which is saying something, because Leeds were brilliant against Bristol City. But the narrow margins Leeds play with in the Championship are hard to enjoy. It was afterwards, with the points won and the anxiety over, that we could revel in what had been done, and what had happened elsewhere.

Some fans had left, which is their choice, although I find it strange that Elland Road is both a holy site of pilgrimage the football club must never vacate, and a place to leave as quickly as possible because a quicker journey home outweighs the pleasure of being in our second home. But anyway, the stands were still full enough to cheer Luke Ayling and Kalvin Phillips on their march of honour around the pitch, the Scratching Shed goading Kalvin into taking over Pontus Jansson’s old fist-pumping celebration.

Leeds hadn’t won more than three points, hadn’t scored more than one goal, and the opposition wasn’t a significant scalp. But the celebrations were justified because of the boost from Barnsley, and our basic need, during recent weeks, to experience a moment like this. At full-time Marcelo Bielsa hugged Ezgjan Alioski, who he recently dropped from the team, and after all the strife and gloom it was good for everyone to hug it all out and start again.

The point of January was starting again. In the positive sense, Jean-Kévin Augustin and Ian Poveda arrived to reset the failures of Eddie Nketiah and Jack Clarke. In the negative sense, the gap to 3rd disappeared and, as Luke Ayling admitted after the defeat to Nottingham Forest, all the work up to that game no longer counted for anything in the league. Leeds had no choice but starting again. They had to scrap the season so far and concentrate on being one of the two best teams between this week and May.

Ayling looked and sounded distraught in that interview. In the two games he’s played since, he has been superb. So have his teammates, with one momentary exception at Brentford. It’s as if Leeds had forgotten the motivation that seeing the abyss at the end of last season gave them for this, and were being drawn towards it again like lemmings. They looked over the edge at Nottingham, and remembered, and that was enough.

Against Bristol City, Leeds played like a recent memory, of the first half at Arsenal in the FA Cup when for 45 exhilarating minutes we were Champions League contenders again. The crisp one-touch passing, the constant danger from the wings, the high press and the dominance of possession meant Bristol City were not competing but chasing. Possession stats get a hard time, but Leeds played 432 successful passes to Bristol’s 150. Only one team was playing football. The other wasn’t allowed.

And yes, all the familiar failings were present too, the final passes and the finishing. Scored on the quarter-hour, Ayling’s first half winner was Bielsa’s Leeds in miniature, it’s only fault against type that it was scored too soon. The ball was worked into the penalty area where it was kicked, blocked, hacked at, deflected, sliced, cleared, returned, rolled and whacked, as Leeds players poured forward with their hands in the air, thinking they could be the one to score, and Bristol players poured backward with their hands over their mouths, ready to vomit their nerves if the ball, the bloody football, didn’t just go away. Instead it went to Luke Ayling who forced it into his former club’s net.

In the time it took them to score that goal, Leeds had more chances to score a goal than many teams create in a match. While most teams create a chance and either take it or don’t, then wait a while and create another, Leeds United’s desire for winning the ball back immediately and trying again immediately makes Bielsa’s desire to ‘unbalance the opponent’ as vivid as slapstick. I’ve never seen a team take their corners so quickly, and I’ve never seen opposition so visibly stricken by lack of time to think.

There was more pinball and a shot against the bar from Stuart Dallas; Pat Bamford buried the rebound but was offside. He should have buried Helder Costa’s pull-back in the second half; somehow he let Daniel Bentley make a point blank save. Costa should have scored past Bentley himself; running onto a clever long pass from Liam Cooper, he got around the goalkeeper and saw the goal empty, until Bentley scrambled back to fill it again. I couldn’t count how many times Costa and Jackie Harrison had chances to cross or cut-back or shoot that didn’t work; one Harrison shot, from close range, hit the bar hard. Augustin came on and shot just wide. Maybe he’ll start scoring these sorts of chances, or maybe Leeds are going to do it to him, too.

Bristol’s best chance wasn’t given to them when the referee refused to award a penalty for handball against Luke Ayling. Their manager, Lee Johnson, literally hopped with madness and then, when his complaining was done in the post-match interviews, lamented that his players hadn’t shown their ‘USPs’. Their other chance came from Kiko Casilla’s standard attempt to make the game interesting and us angry by giving a pass away, and that was as dangerous as it got from City. Watching Bamford turn his marker on halfway, sprint towards goal, attempt a stepover and trip himself up was a perfect example of Bristol’s relegation to audience: United’s only enemy in these matches is themselves.

I hope we’re at peace with that now. We’ve been waiting all season for luck, or something, to change in front of goal, but with thirteen games left it feels a little late now. Leeds will carry on having countless beautiful chances but will score one scruffy goal. They’ll hurt faint hearts with their defending but keep a clean sheet. They’ll miss chances so easy you look at the replays frame-by-frame not in anger but wonder; and they’ll fall flat on their faces with such perfectly scripted slapstick timing that you have to laugh with them now, not at them.

I don’t quite know how we ended up stuck with such a bunch of goofballs leading our promotion attempt, or how they got to be so good at football when sometimes they can hardly stand up straight, but I’ll take the whole gang of them over the soul-free eeriness awaiting in the Premier League. And I’ll forever be grateful if the loons actually pull promotion off, and do it like this, too.

Which they just might. While Elland Road was anxious about letting Bristol steal something, and was denied its second cheer until Barnsley provided, there was never the panic that has gripped other games this season. It felt appropriate that the game ended as Kalvin Phillips held off Ashley Williams and held onto the ball, and held onto our hopes, with so much strength, skill and determination that Williams’ only option was to foul him. Phillips was peerless in this match, his positioning and anticipation getting to Bristol’s every chance to cross halfway before they did. He was stronger, faster and wiser than any Bristol player, and so were the white shirts around him.

That gulf in class between Leeds and the middle ranks of this division, that we hear about from their overawed fans and reporters almost every week without always seeing it ourselves, might never, for whatever reason, manifest in the huge margins of victory they should. But instead of big scorelines Leeds have big spleens, the deep commitment and strong desire they’ve shown this week, after Nottingham, by starting again. That counts for a lot. ◉

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Davefevs said:

Imho the only one of our 4 starting midfielders who had anything like a decent game.  He massively helped a poor triumvirate of Baker, Dasilva and Paterson in the opening 30 minutes, probably to the detriment of helping Henriksen.  His interceptions, ball recoveries, etc were very high in number on Saturday trying to stem to tide.  Without him getting a grip (of sorts) in there it might’ve been worse.

It’s what Smith would get credit for, but it seems with Han-Noah it’s taken more for granted and everyone focuses analysis of him on the ball.  Don’t get me wrong he does need to improve on the ball.  It’s a bit chicken and egg though.  If he was asked to play as a true DM in say a 4141, like Smith, but with less responsibility for progressing attacks, I think he’d be able to show us more of what he can do.  But it’s a very responsible position for an 18 year old.  It’s not dissimilar to Morrell for Wales where Giggs gave him the DM role and told him to just do that....which he did with aplomb.

His early games in the 532/5212 predominantly alongside Brownhill, but importantly with Palmer, meant all he had to do was “get it” and “give it”.  Both Brownhill and more so Palmer had the adventurous mentality, even if Josh constrained himself to help Han-Noah settle in.

There was one occasion in the second half where he intercepted on the left half of the pitch and broke forward at pace.  Instead of one of our forwards (Pato and Wells I think) breaking into the free left channel (as Ayling was caught forward), both rang long and right, meaning the smart pass / easier pass wasn’t on....and the move broke down.  It’s little things like that means he’ll get the criticism, but I think there are mitigating circumstances.

Your last paragraph rings true so many times when we play Dave.

The amount of times our forwards or offensive midfielders run into the wrong areas to receive a pass is astounding...it really is something I've noticed. So much so, that it's an unnatural movement and something that doesn't make sense.

Something that's crossed my mind, is that players are told to penetrate certain areas of the pitch..without taking into consideration whether they can receive the ball or not.

There are natural shapes and angles that occur during a game. If an opponent goes into a defensive position, you have to create an angle to receive to negate it.

I'm wondering whether players are running into areas they are told to, regardless of whether they can receive the pass or not. The staticians will tick the box for them and no one can argue with them for not going there.

It really is that noticeable.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, SR1 said:

The bloke who does these reports expresses himself in a prosaic manner, but I thought (possibly wrongly) that you might be interested in it. Although he is critical of you he is also painfully aware, as are most of us, of our immense fallibility and over-achievement.

https://www.thesquareball.net/leeds-united/leeds-united-1-0-bristol-city-starting-again/?fbclid=IwAR12sFfT_K76wBrsEnHjvtHTizFX2AHPyFto4BRJ0htVWxM6ttaHheuXYaM

Elland Road never got its second goal on Saturday. Leeds United promised and promised, tormented and teased, but it was Barnsley who obliged. Even their score was held tantalisingly back from the list of results on the big screen, but the noise when their 3-0 win over Fulham was revealed was as loud as it would have been for any Leeds goal. It sounded like joy, excitement and relief, and an awful lot like belief.

The minutes after full-time were maybe the best of the day, which is saying something, because Leeds were brilliant against Bristol City. But the narrow margins Leeds play with in the Championship are hard to enjoy. It was afterwards, with the points won and the anxiety over, that we could revel in what had been done, and what had happened elsewhere.

Some fans had left, which is their choice, although I find it strange that Elland Road is both a holy site of pilgrimage the football club must never vacate, and a place to leave as quickly as possible because a quicker journey home outweighs the pleasure of being in our second home. But anyway, the stands were still full enough to cheer Luke Ayling and Kalvin Phillips on their march of honour around the pitch, the Scratching Shed goading Kalvin into taking over Pontus Jansson’s old fist-pumping celebration.

Leeds hadn’t won more than three points, hadn’t scored more than one goal, and the opposition wasn’t a significant scalp. But the celebrations were justified because of the boost from Barnsley, and our basic need, during recent weeks, to experience a moment like this. At full-time Marcelo Bielsa hugged Ezgjan Alioski, who he recently dropped from the team, and after all the strife and gloom it was good for everyone to hug it all out and start again.

The point of January was starting again. In the positive sense, Jean-Kévin Augustin and Ian Poveda arrived to reset the failures of Eddie Nketiah and Jack Clarke. In the negative sense, the gap to 3rd disappeared and, as Luke Ayling admitted after the defeat to Nottingham Forest, all the work up to that game no longer counted for anything in the league. Leeds had no choice but starting again. They had to scrap the season so far and concentrate on being one of the two best teams between this week and May.

Ayling looked and sounded distraught in that interview. In the two games he’s played since, he has been superb. So have his teammates, with one momentary exception at Brentford. It’s as if Leeds had forgotten the motivation that seeing the abyss at the end of last season gave them for this, and were being drawn towards it again like lemmings. They looked over the edge at Nottingham, and remembered, and that was enough.

Against Bristol City, Leeds played like a recent memory, of the first half at Arsenal in the FA Cup when for 45 exhilarating minutes we were Champions League contenders again. The crisp one-touch passing, the constant danger from the wings, the high press and the dominance of possession meant Bristol City were not competing but chasing. Possession stats get a hard time, but Leeds played 432 successful passes to Bristol’s 150. Only one team was playing football. The other wasn’t allowed.

And yes, all the familiar failings were present too, the final passes and the finishing. Scored on the quarter-hour, Ayling’s first half winner was Bielsa’s Leeds in miniature, it’s only fault against type that it was scored too soon. The ball was worked into the penalty area where it was kicked, blocked, hacked at, deflected, sliced, cleared, returned, rolled and whacked, as Leeds players poured forward with their hands in the air, thinking they could be the one to score, and Bristol players poured backward with their hands over their mouths, ready to vomit their nerves if the ball, the bloody football, didn’t just go away. Instead it went to Luke Ayling who forced it into his former club’s net.

In the time it took them to score that goal, Leeds had more chances to score a goal than many teams create in a match. While most teams create a chance and either take it or don’t, then wait a while and create another, Leeds United’s desire for winning the ball back immediately and trying again immediately makes Bielsa’s desire to ‘unbalance the opponent’ as vivid as slapstick. I’ve never seen a team take their corners so quickly, and I’ve never seen opposition so visibly stricken by lack of time to think.

There was more pinball and a shot against the bar from Stuart Dallas; Pat Bamford buried the rebound but was offside. He should have buried Helder Costa’s pull-back in the second half; somehow he let Daniel Bentley make a point blank save. Costa should have scored past Bentley himself; running onto a clever long pass from Liam Cooper, he got around the goalkeeper and saw the goal empty, until Bentley scrambled back to fill it again. I couldn’t count how many times Costa and Jackie Harrison had chances to cross or cut-back or shoot that didn’t work; one Harrison shot, from close range, hit the bar hard. Augustin came on and shot just wide. Maybe he’ll start scoring these sorts of chances, or maybe Leeds are going to do it to him, too.

Bristol’s best chance wasn’t given to them when the referee refused to award a penalty for handball against Luke Ayling. Their manager, Lee Johnson, literally hopped with madness and then, when his complaining was done in the post-match interviews, lamented that his players hadn’t shown their ‘USPs’. Their other chance came from Kiko Casilla’s standard attempt to make the game interesting and us angry by giving a pass away, and that was as dangerous as it got from City. Watching Bamford turn his marker on halfway, sprint towards goal, attempt a stepover and trip himself up was a perfect example of Bristol’s relegation to audience: United’s only enemy in these matches is themselves.

I hope we’re at peace with that now. We’ve been waiting all season for luck, or something, to change in front of goal, but with thirteen games left it feels a little late now. Leeds will carry on having countless beautiful chances but will score one scruffy goal. They’ll hurt faint hearts with their defending but keep a clean sheet. They’ll miss chances so easy you look at the replays frame-by-frame not in anger but wonder; and they’ll fall flat on their faces with such perfectly scripted slapstick timing that you have to laugh with them now, not at them.

I don’t quite know how we ended up stuck with such a bunch of goofballs leading our promotion attempt, or how they got to be so good at football when sometimes they can hardly stand up straight, but I’ll take the whole gang of them over the soul-free eeriness awaiting in the Premier League. And I’ll forever be grateful if the loons actually pull promotion off, and do it like this, too.

Which they just might. While Elland Road was anxious about letting Bristol steal something, and was denied its second cheer until Barnsley provided, there was never the panic that has gripped other games this season. It felt appropriate that the game ended as Kalvin Phillips held off Ashley Williams and held onto the ball, and held onto our hopes, with so much strength, skill and determination that Williams’ only option was to foul him. Phillips was peerless in this match, his positioning and anticipation getting to Bristol’s every chance to cross halfway before they did. He was stronger, faster and wiser than any Bristol player, and so were the white shirts around him.

That gulf in class between Leeds and the middle ranks of this division, that we hear about from their overawed fans and reporters almost every week without always seeing it ourselves, might never, for whatever reason, manifest in the huge margins of victory they should. But instead of big scorelines Leeds have big spleens, the deep commitment and strong desire they’ve shown this week, after Nottingham, by starting again. That counts for a lot. ◉

 

"Some fans had left" ... before the final whistle? At Elland Road?

Frankly, I - we - are  .......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, spudski said:

Your last paragraph rings true so many times when we play Dave.

The amount of times our forwards or offensive midfielders run into the wrong areas to receive a pass is astounding...it really is something I've noticed. So much so, that it's an unnatural movement and something that doesn't make sense.

Something that's crossed my mind, is that players are told to penetrate certain areas of the pitch..without taking into consideration whether they can receive the ball or not.

There are natural shapes and angles that occur during a game. If an opponent goes into a defensive position, you have to create an angle to receive to negate it.

I'm wondering whether players are running into areas they are told to, regardless of whether they can receive the pass or not. The staticians will tick the box for them and no one can argue with them for not going there.

It really is that noticeable.

I find that we consistently do not seem to want to attack the space in behind the full backs, there were plenty of occasions against Derby where both Eliasson and Pato had tons of space to attack leaving a simple pass over the top to exploit, the passes don't even have to come off to be effective as you stretch the full backs by just making the runs from time to time, yet inexplicably to me they realise where they are and just stop. 

And the forwards are the same they often don't run the channels and stretch the defence instead stopping and playing in front of the opposition. I was generally happy to put this down to poor movement on our part, but it's so many different players that do it it almost makes me think it has to be under instruction for some reason. 

  • Like 1
  • Aubergine 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, spudski said:

Your last paragraph rings true so many times when we play Dave.

The amount of times our forwards or offensive midfielders run into the wrong areas to receive a pass is astounding...it really is something I've noticed. So much so, that it's an unnatural movement and something that doesn't make sense.

Something that's crossed my mind, is that players are told to penetrate certain areas of the pitch..without taking into consideration whether they can receive the ball or not.

There are natural shapes and angles that occur during a game. If an opponent goes into a defensive position, you have to create an angle to receive to negate it.

I'm wondering whether players are running into areas they are told to, regardless of whether they can receive the pass or not. The staticians will tick the box for them and no one can argue with them for not going there.

It really is that noticeable.

 

The second video shows how a right winger can come off the line, create space for themselves and their teammate.  Look how patient Ayling is (41secs), then the RW (51secs) comes inside.

In our set up its like Eliasson is obstructed to hug the touchline, 20 yards ahead of the ball, irrespective of marker, angles etc.  He might get the ball and skip inside off his marker with the ball, but he rarely moves away from the touchline without the ball.  We feel massively rigid.

I doubt Monaco youth and adult teams have been set up to play so rigidly.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Moments of Pleasure said:

"Some fans had left" ... before the final whistle? At Elland Road?

Frankly, I - we - are  .......

😅

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Davefevs said:

 

The second video shows how a right winger can come off the line, create space for themselves and their teammate.  Look how patient Ayling is (41secs), then the RW (51secs) comes inside.

In our set up its like Eliasson is obstructed to hug the touchline, 20 yards ahead of the ball, irrespective of marker, angles etc.  He might get the ball and skip inside off his marker with the ball, but he rarely moves away from the touchline without the ball.  We feel massively rigid.

I doubt Monaco youth and adult teams have been set up to play so rigidly.

 

It's not just the movement its the way they quickly switch play and then start moving off that, in the first video when Leeds switch the play it immediately starts to pull the WBA side out of shape, we might move the ball in the same way, but it will take us 2 maybe 3 passes to switch the play, by which time the opposition have shifted and their shape is retained. 

Not only do we not move effectively we do not move the ball around quick enough. 

To be brutally fair it is a massive testament to Fam and Wiemann in particular that they are as effective up front as they are considering how ponderous we are to move the ball around in an attacking sense. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Spud55 said:

I find that we consistently do not seem to want to attack the space in behind the full backs, there were plenty of occasions against Derby where both Eliasson and Pato had tons of space to attack leaving a simple pass over the top to exploit, the passes don't even have to come off to be effective as you stretch the full backs by just making the runs from time to time, yet inexplicably to me they realise where they are and just stop. 

And the forwards are the same they often don't run the channels and stretch the defence instead stopping and playing in front of the opposition. I was generally happy to put this down to poor movement on our part, but it's so many different players that do it it almost makes me think it has to be under instruction for some reason. 

Eliasson did it one and I think Williams clipped a ball it through to him....I thought he’d cracked it.  Alas, not!!

What you’ve written there forms part of my tactical philosophy - if I were ever to be a manager.

BEAEF076-A0A8-474A-80AB-01B61553442F.jpeg.feca1a89a911e779a2fa4d31570e52b8.jpeg

pic above....static movement (oxymoron), no easy pass - last season Pack on the ball

E70CD47A-A9F5-4013-BFE5-0D473D2EC42A.jpeg.1e47ab9717ba5499504f4fc9f1a3e361.jpeg

Pic 2 - a simple but clever run from Weimann, dragging CB and LB with him because he runs where he can’t be passed on properly by the defender (Hogan fantastic at this), creating space for Hunt to either get the pass or get a ball round the corner from Weimann.

Think i drew these after Preston (h) in 18/19.

We don’t see enough movement combinations.  Why is that?

Edited by Davefevs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Davefevs said:

 

The second video shows how a right winger can come off the line, create space for themselves and their teammate.  Look how patient Ayling is (41secs), then the RW (51secs) comes inside.

In our set up its like Eliasson is obstructed to hug the touchline, 20 yards ahead of the ball, irrespective of marker, angles etc.  He might get the ball and skip inside off his marker with the ball, but he rarely moves away from the touchline without the ball.  We feel massively rigid.

I doubt Monaco youth and adult teams have been set up to play so rigidly.

 

I've been saying the same things for months mate. We hug the touchline, but rarely come inside.

In doing so, we make it so easy to defend against. Come inside a little and you get 360 degrees of movement. Hug the touchline and you automatically make it 180 degrees. So, so easy to defend.

As Spud55 has also noticed...it makes us massively rigid.

Football is fluid and has natural movement. It's like water going around rocks, it finds its route by natural angles. You can't go through rocks...you have to go around them or over them depending on space and speed.

Our movement, or lack of it, is often unnatural and looks often like a player has been told to be in certain areas as that's what the stats show as most effective, but not taking into consideration the opposition stopping it. You have to move accordingly to what's happening in front of you. 

I tear my hair out at space and angles not occupied by our players when natural opportunity arises.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, spudski said:

I've been saying the same things for months mate. We hug the touchline, but rarely come inside.

In doing so, we make it so easy to defend against. Come inside a little and you get 360 degrees of movement. Hug the touchline and you automatically make it 180 degrees. So, so easy to defend.

As Spud55 has also noticed...it makes us massively rigid.

Football is fluid and has natural movement. It's like water going around rocks, it finds its route by natural angles. You can't go through rocks...you have to go around them or over them depending on space and speed.

Our movement, or lack of it, is often unnatural and looks often like a player has been told to be in certain areas as that's what the stats show as most effective, but not taking into consideration the opposition stopping it. You have to move accordingly to what's happening in front of you. 

I tear my hair out at space and angles not occupied by our players when natural opportunity arises.

....and then people say we are ponderous on the ball.  Benkovic stepping into midfield last Wednesday helped drag Derby’s midfield out of shape that did give us a bit of fluidity.  The one long ball he hit over the top to Hunt kept Max Lowe and Tom Lawrence honest, which in turn created space elsewhere.  It’s a simpler game when our players move, especially when it’s intelligent enough to take account of the position of the ball on the pitch, the opposition and teammate(s) position.

I haven’t done any coaching badges, but played for teams with or coached by enough ex-pros to understand patterns of play and angles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Davefevs said:

....and then people say we are ponderous on the ball.  Benkovic stepping into midfield last Wednesday helped drag Derby’s midfield out of shape that did give us a bit of fluidity.  The one long ball he hit over the top to Hunt kept Max Lowe and Tom Lawrence honest, which in turn created space elsewhere.  It’s a simpler game when our players move, especially when it’s intelligent enough to take account of the position of the ball on the pitch, the opposition and teammate(s) position.

I haven’t done any coaching badges, but played for teams with or coached by enough ex-pros to understand patterns of play and angles.

Doesn't it also depend who you are playing? Derby are an appalling side with a couple of decent players, but any top six side should be able to out smart them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, SR1 said:

Doesn't it also depend who you are playing? Derby are an appalling side with a couple of decent players, but any top six side should be able to out smart them.

Only 11 teams have outsmarted then this season? 😜

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Davefevs said:

....and then people say we are ponderous on the ball.  Benkovic stepping into midfield last Wednesday helped drag Derby’s midfield out of shape that did give us a bit of fluidity.  The one long ball he hit over the top to Hunt kept Max Lowe and Tom Lawrence honest, which in turn created space elsewhere.  It’s a simpler game when our players move, especially when it’s intelligent enough to take account of the position of the ball on the pitch, the opposition and teammate(s) position.

I haven’t done any coaching badges, but played for teams with or coached by enough ex-pros to understand patterns of play and angles.

Totally agree Dave.

The thing is, watching Leeds or Brentford's movement isn't Rocket Science. All of it is natural. Based on angles and overloads. They play very simple football, but drilled and done well. All of it is natural.

All of our forward movement looks unnatural. I see a player in midfield with the ball, then watch the player in front of him move into the one spot he can't get the ball too. It's getting ridiculous. I've sat there thinking...is this instructed, or a player hiding not to receive, because it's so unnatural.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Davefevs said:

Only 11 teams have outsmarted then this season? 😜

They're still pretty appalling with, as I said, a couple of players that can lift them every now and then. Only 12 teams (or more to the point they've lost 12 games, not sure if there's a double or two in there) have beaten Middlesbrough and they're six points off the bottom three.

 

Edited by SR1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...