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The Bristol City v Cardiff City Match Day Thread 16


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There are more than 10 million sheep in Wales which accounts for over 80% of the Welsh agricultural economy. In New Zealand, while the number has fallen as the country has diversified into beef and swine, there are 30 million sheep. That is about 1 person for every 7 sheep and in Wales the proportion is 1 for every 3. The subject of sheep is relevant to the subject of football because in the relatively distant past a sheeps bladder was used in the manufacture of a football although it was usually procured from the pig family. I have no statistics on the best sheep bladder but if one assumes that the wool from the Welsh mountain sheep has historically been considered of inferior quality to the English sheep, according to Robert Trow-Smith in his book 'A History of British Livestock Husbandry' , the so too the internals. Sheep have often been used in a derogatory fashion, including on this forum, to talk about football fans from the other side of the bridge. Aside from it being a slight on a football fan, debatable for some, it is also for the sheep. And since I have written much about Cardiff, the city and Cardiff the club I was left with Cardiff the fan. May I request, therefore, that the large part of this opening to a thread is not considered my own personal slight on a Cardiff fan but merely to put forward or hypothesise on the subjects place in the hyperbole of the average English fan and how it all really came about.

To set the tone, in the lightest possible way, I derived a commercial from Toyota which, at the time of airing on New Zealand television in 2006, caused an equal measure of hilarity and outrage. The diaspora of British ancestry in New Zealand may very well have pointed toward a Welsh and English divide in those polarised opinions but, alas, that we shall never know. Perhaps it is more subtle in the New World.

The New Zealand Advertising Standards Authority determined the phrase 'sheep shagger' , as depicted in the TV commercial, was not viewed as offensive to the majority of New Zealanders. And so ended the issue. I have a friend who lives in Christchurch and he echoes my opinion that in New Zealand the authorities tend to debate an issue firstly and then, if they cannot decide, they usually allow it to be trialled and if nobody is hurt and if there is benefit to the local community then whatever it is one usually finds it being adopted. This pragmatic approach seems to have placed New Zealand in good stead down the years. I suspect this commercial would not even be aired let alone be debated, after the event, back in the motherland.

In Prestatyn the phrase was the subject of a 2013 court case, after Anthony Taaffe, yes that was his surname, from Bolton and a guest at a holiday park in Gronant, called an off-duty policeman and security staff "a bunch of sheep shaggers". In Taaffe's defence he claimed that the phrase was "a term for people living in the countryside". He also admitted a second similar offence in which he called a police officer at the custody unit to which he had been taken, a "Welsh sheep shagger". Taaffe was fined £150 after he admitted racially aggravated disorderly behaviour. They clearly don't like it 'up and at em' in Wales. 

There is not a lot of depth or need for such in understanding where this expression derived; in New Zealand, Like Wales, there are more sheep than people and Australia and England respectively have derogatively used the term because of it. Although the following conversation may have happened at some point in history and places a slightly different slant on the origin making out that the Welsh are perhaps rather cunning and the English, taking something at face value, deferentially fair. 

Englishman "You are going to have your hand chopped off with an axe because you stole a sheep." 

Welshman "I was in fact taking the sheep to f--k." 

Englishman "Oh, thats good then our law endorses sheep shaggers. You will only have to lose a finger.

In the Lleyn Peninsula and on the upland plateau between Abergwessin in Brecon and the Devils Bridge in Cardiganshire, to this day, live the purest breed of Welsh sheep. In almost all other areas of Wales the sheep is an amalgam of English and Welsh breeding. The Rhiw Sheep of these two areas is a small tan faced animal light in frame and fleece and virtually unfattable. No wonder Sheep from out yonder were bred in much greater numbers leaving these skinny mountain runts to engage in other obscure pursuits or provide meagre rations of sheep wool for tea towels and old rags. Wales will forever be known for sheep regardless of whether they are of a majority English blood line.

The Yorkshireman in charge of the highest placed Welsh team in the football pyramid crosses the border this morning full of outward bravado and not a little confidence. The Welsh may or may not have the last say on this thread. Marvellous folk they are really entrusting their rise to an Englishman who has certainly so far been doing is usual sterling job. That Wales even have teams in an English league is a unique anomaly that much of the world would not understand. I don't really understand it either but thats for another day. Many say this match is a barometer of how much the club have progressed. I doubt it and, moreover, we should simply place faith in the management to do their homework, set up their team and motivate them with their usual knowhow. The end result will not be season defining but it will be very satisfying to witness broad smiles on our faithful flock come 5pm.

 

 

 

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49 minutes ago, havanatopia said:

There are more than 10 million sheep in Wales which accounts for over 80% of the Welsh agricultural economy. In New Zealand, while the number has fallen as the country has diversified into beef and swine, there are 30 million sheep. That is about 1 person for every 7 sheep and in Wales the proportion is 1 for every 3. The subject of sheep is relevant to the subject of football because in the relatively distant past a sheeps bladder was used in the manufacture of a football although it was usually procured from the pig family. I have no statistics on the best sheep bladder but if one assumes that the wool from the Welsh mountain sheep has historically been considered of inferior quality to the English sheep, according to Robert Trow-Smith in his book 'A History of British Livestock Husbandry' , the so too the internals. Sheep have often been used in a derogatory fashion, including on this forum, to talk about football fans from the other side of the bridge. Aside from it being a slight on a football fan, debatable for some, it is also for the sheep. And since I have written much about Cardiff, the city and Cardiff the club I was left with Cardiff the fan. May I request, therefore, that the large part of this opening to a thread is not considered my own personal slight on a Cardiff fan but merely to put forward or hypothesise on the subjects place in the hyperbole of the average English fan and how it all really came about.

To set the tone, in the lightest possible way, I derived a commercial from Toyota which, at the time of airing on New Zealand television in 2006, caused an equal measure of hilarity and outrage. The diaspora of British ancestry in New Zealand may very well have pointed toward a Welsh and English divide in those polarised opinions but, alas, that we shall never know. Perhaps it is more subtle in the New World.

The New Zealand Advertising Standards Authority determined the phrase 'sheep shagger' , as depicted in the TV commercial, was not viewed as offensive to the majority of New Zealanders. And so ended the issue. I have a friend who lives in Christchurch and he echoes my opinion that in New Zealand the authorities tend to debate an issue firstly and then, if they cannot decide, they usually allow it to be trialled and if nobody is hurt and if there is benefit to the local community then whatever it is one usually finds it being adopted. This pragmatic approach seems to have placed New Zealand in good stead down the years. I suspect this commercial would not even be aired let alone be debated, after the event, back in the motherland.

In Prestatyn the phrase was the subject of a 2013 court case, after Anthony Taaffe, yes that was his surname, from Bolton and a guest at a holiday park in Gronant, called an off-duty policeman and security staff "a bunch of sheep shaggers". In Taaffe's defence he claimed that the phrase was "a term for people living in the countryside". He also admitted a second similar offence in which he called a police officer at the custody unit to which he had been taken, a "Welsh sheep shagger". Taaffe was fined £150 after he admitted racially aggravated disorderly behaviour. They clearly don't like it 'up and at em' in Wales. 

There is not a lot of depth or need for such in understanding where this expression derived; in New Zealand, Like Wales, there are more sheep than people and Australia and England respectively have derogatively used the term because of it. Although the following conversation may have happened at some point in history and places a slightly different slant on the origin making out that the Welsh are perhaps rather cunning and the English, taking something at face value, deferentially fair. 

Englishman "You are going to have your hand chopped off with an axe because you stole a sheep." 

Welshman "I was in fact taking the sheep to f--k." 

Englishman "Oh, thats good then our law endorses sheep shaggers. You will only have to lose a finger.

In the Lleyn Peninsula and on the upland plateau between Abergwessin in Brecon and the Devils Bridge in Cardiganshire, to this day, live the purest breed of Welsh sheep. In almost all other areas of Wales the sheep is an amalgam of English and Welsh breeding. The Rhiw Sheep of these two areas is a small tan faced animal light in frame and fleece and virtually unfattable. No wonder Sheep from out yonder were bred in much greater numbers leaving these skinny mountain runts to engage in other obscure pursuits or provide meagre rations of sheep wool for tea towels and old rags. Wales will forever be known for sheep regardless of whether they are of a majority English blood line.

The Yorkshireman in charge of the highest placed Welsh team in the football pyramid crosses the border this morning full of outward bravado and not a little confidence. The Welsh may or may not have the last say on this thread. Marvellous folk they are really entrusting their rise to an Englishman who has certainly so far been doing is usual sterling job. That Wales even have teams in an English league is a unique anomaly that much of the world would not understand. I don't really understand it either but thats for another day. Many say this match is a barometer of how much the club have progressed. I doubt it and, moreover, we should simply place faith in the management to do their homework, set up their team and motivate them with their usual knowhow. The end result will not be season defining but it will be very satisfying to witness broad smiles on our faithful flock come 5pm.

 

 

 

You mean 2pm, lunchtime KO, :)

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34 minutes ago, red angler said:

You mean 2pm, lunchtime KO, :)

Seriously you had to quote the entire bloody thing to do that, who else do you think people thought you were replying too ?

 

Seriously annoying just reply to the thread don't quote the whole thing.

 

 

1 hour ago, havanatopia said:

There are more than 10 million sheep in Wales which accounts for over 80% of the Welsh agricultural economy. In New Zealand, while the number has fallen as the country has diversified into beef and swine, there are 30 million sheep. That is about 1 person for every 7 sheep and in Wales the proportion is 1 for every 3. The subject of sheep is relevant to the subject of football because in the relatively distant past a sheeps bladder was used in the manufacture of a football although it was usually procured from the pig family. I have no statistics on the best sheep bladder but if one assumes that the wool from the Welsh mountain sheep has historically been considered of inferior quality to the English sheep, according to Robert Trow-Smith in his book 'A History of British Livestock Husbandry' , the so too the internals. Sheep have often been used in a derogatory fashion, including on this forum, to talk about football fans from the other side of the bridge. Aside from it being a slight on a football fan, debatable for some, it is also for the sheep. And since I have written much about Cardiff, the city and Cardiff the club I was left with Cardiff the fan. May I request, therefore, that the large part of this opening to a thread is not considered my own personal slight on a Cardiff fan but merely to put forward or hypothesise on the subjects place in the hyperbole of the average English fan and how it all really came about.

To set the tone, in the lightest possible way, I derived a commercial from Toyota which, at the time of airing on New Zealand television in 2006, caused an equal measure of hilarity and outrage. The diaspora of British ancestry in New Zealand may very well have pointed toward a Welsh and English divide in those polarised opinions but, alas, that we shall never know. Perhaps it is more subtle in the New World.

The New Zealand Advertising Standards Authority determined the phrase 'sheep shagger' , as depicted in the TV commercial, was not viewed as offensive to the majority of New Zealanders. And so ended the issue. I have a friend who lives in Christchurch and he echoes my opinion that in New Zealand the authorities tend to debate an issue firstly and then, if they cannot decide, they usually allow it to be trialled and if nobody is hurt and if there is benefit to the local community then whatever it is one usually finds it being adopted. This pragmatic approach seems to have placed New Zealand in good stead down the years. I suspect this commercial would not even be aired let alone be debated, after the event, back in the motherland.

In Prestatyn the phrase was the subject of a 2013 court case, after Anthony Taaffe, yes that was his surname, from Bolton and a guest at a holiday park in Gronant, called an off-duty policeman and security staff "a bunch of sheep shaggers". In Taaffe's defence he claimed that the phrase was "a term for people living in the countryside". He also admitted a second similar offence in which he called a police officer at the custody unit to which he had been taken, a "Welsh sheep shagger". Taaffe was fined £150 after he admitted racially aggravated disorderly behaviour. They clearly don't like it 'up and at em' in Wales. 

There is not a lot of depth or need for such in understanding where this expression derived; in New Zealand, Like Wales, there are more sheep than people and Australia and England respectively have derogatively used the term because of it. Although the following conversation may have happened at some point in history and places a slightly different slant on the origin making out that the Welsh are perhaps rather cunning and the English, taking something at face value, deferentially fair. 

Englishman "You are going to have your hand chopped off with an axe because you stole a sheep." 

Welshman "I was in fact taking the sheep to f--k." 

Englishman "Oh, thats good then our law endorses sheep shaggers. You will only have to lose a finger.

In the Lleyn Peninsula and on the upland plateau between Abergwessin in Brecon and the Devils Bridge in Cardiganshire, to this day, live the purest breed of Welsh sheep. In almost all other areas of Wales the sheep is an amalgam of English and Welsh breeding. The Rhiw Sheep of these two areas is a small tan faced animal light in frame and fleece and virtually unfattable. No wonder Sheep from out yonder were bred in much greater numbers leaving these skinny mountain runts to engage in other obscure pursuits or provide meagre rations of sheep wool for tea towels and old rags. Wales will forever be known for sheep regardless of whether they are of a majority English blood line.

The Yorkshireman in charge of the highest placed Welsh team in the football pyramid crosses the border this morning full of outward bravado and not a little confidence. The Welsh may or may not have the last say on this thread. Marvellous folk they are really entrusting their rise to an Englishman who has certainly so far been doing is usual sterling job. That Wales even have teams in an English league is a unique anomaly that much of the world would not understand. I don't really understand it either but thats for another day. Many say this match is a barometer of how much the club have progressed. I doubt it and, moreover, we should simply place faith in the management to do their homework, set up their team and motivate them with their usual knowhow. The end result will not be season defining but it will be very satisfying to witness broad smiles on our faithful flock come 5pm.

 

 

 

Nice write up Hav. 

Ooops:P

 

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47 minutes ago, CyderInACan said:

I'm torn between (i) the players being fire up to "win it for Bails" or (ii) our plans having being flushed down the sh*tter by the FA's farcical 2-match ban for being fouled. 

Either way it's gonna be a tough game, with a certain rotund, trouble-making, philanderer no doubt fated to have a hand in the outcome. 

Yep, watch Tomlin have a stormer today.

Then cue the 'We should never have got rid of Tomlin. Johnson just didn't know how to play him' comments on here afterwards.

 

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3 minutes ago, CHAZ MICHAELS said:

Yep, watch Tomlin have a stormer today.

Then cue the 'We should never have got rid of Tomlin. Johnson just didn't know how to play him' comments on here afterwards.

 

Fear you may be right... Cardiff winning 1-2 with Tomlin either scoring or setting up their winner. On the other hand LJ may for the first time outwit Colin and deliver the tactics for a home win. Here's hoping for the later.

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41 minutes ago, Fordy62 said:

I’m still convinced that Cardiff are punching above their weight in terms of league position. Lets help them find their true place. 

Genuinely I think we’ll be too industrious For them if the City that player Fulham turn up. If the City that played Sunderland turn up, we might be in trouble. 

Think you maybe right. Whilst they have beaten Wolves, Villa, Leeds, Sheff Utd and Mboro so far this season they have failed to beat Fulham away and Derby at home. They are there for the taking.

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17 minutes ago, OldlandReddies said:

Think you maybe right. Whilst they have beaten Wolves, Villa, Leeds, Sheff Utd and Mboro so far this season they have failed to beat Fulham away and Derby at home. They are there for the taking.

In fairness that’s a very impressive list of teams they’ve beaten which suggests I might be wrong! Oops. 

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20 minutes ago, CHAZ MICHAELS said:

Yep, watch Tomlin have a stormer today.

Then cue the 'We should never have got rid of Tomlin. Johnson just didn't know how to play him' comments on here afterwards.

 

We know he has talent & 'on 'ees day(rare) can be quality-even if he tares it up today I don't think too many will be ruing his departure.

There has been a fresh spring breeze gently blowing through the squad since he left,pushing away the stagnant fug ..

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6 minutes ago, Red white and red said:

Hmmm lot of pessimism on this thread. tell me, do people think we have no chance against Cardiff?...

We haven't beaten them since 2012, and we have a poor record against Warnock sides. Also, Cardiff have started the season very well and have claimed some impressive results this season. Obviously we have a chance but it will certainly be a difficult game.

However, the feeling should we will will be absolutely amazing :fingerscrossed:

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